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By NewsGram Staff Writer

Located at the susceptible juncture of the Eurasian and the Indian tectonic plate, the two giant plates that push up Everest by a few millimetres every year, Nepal has seen its fair share of earthquakes over the years.

Not many as powerful as the earthquake that ripped it apart on Saturday though.

According to an expert the earthquake that wreaked havoc in the Himalayan nation had the power of 20 thermonuclear atomic bombs, the Independent reported.

The impact was amplified due to the shallowness of the epicenter of earthquake. Striking at 10-15 kms from the ground, the tremors were felt more strongly because there was virtually no earth to absorb the shock.

The aftershocks that followed were no less in impact. The tremor that occurred just half an hour after the main earthquake, struck with a whopping magnitude of 6.6. More than 20 others have followed since.

The only solace is provided by the fact that the disaster could have been even worse. Had the earthquake struck the sand and silt areas of Nepal, instead of the solid bedrock of the most impacted regions, the damage would have been compounded manifold.

Officials say more than 3500 people have lost their lives in the disaster till now. The death toll is expected to rise as the devastation becomes clearer.

Also, an additional 6500 people have been seriously injured according to the National Emergency Operation Centre.

Meanwhile, almost 90 per cent of the army is out on search and rescue operations.

Army spokesman Jagdish Pokhrel said, “Just about every member of Nepal’s 100,000-soldier army is currently involved in rescue operations.”


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