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How Netflix Binge-Watching Can Lead You The “Mean World Syndrome”

Binge-watching has been defined as watching three or more episodes of a TV show in one sitting.

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They catalogued the instances of violence in each show, including frequency, nature, justification, and perpetrator and target characteristics. The researchers found violence in the top-streamed shows was very prevalent, graphic and intentional. Pixabay

If you wait for the weekend to watch multiple episodes of the popular Netflix shows that portray violence, chances are you may see the world as meaner than it really is – a phenomenon known as “mean world syndrome”, suggests new research.

For the study, the researchers from Boston University College of Communication looked at five most commonly binge-watched online TV series – all of which were Netflix original shows: House of Cards, Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, Marco Polo, Bloodline and Daredevil.

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When they examined the survey results, the researchers found that the more hours spent watching these online original series, the more likely it was that the viewer saw the world as a mean and scary place. Pixabay

They catalogued the instances of violence in each show, including frequency, nature, justification, and perpetrator and target characteristics. The researchers found violence in the top-streamed shows was very prevalent, graphic and intentional.

Binge-watching has been defined as watching three or more episodes of a TV show in one sitting.

To see what effects, if any, watching these shows had on frequent viewers, BU College of Communication researchers Sarah Krongard and Mina Tsay-Vogel surveyed 366 undergraduate students who participated in the study.

Netflix
For the study, the researchers from Boston University College of Communication looked at five most commonly binge-watched online TV series – all of which were Netflix original shows: House of Cards, Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, Marco Polo, Bloodline and Daredevil. Pixabay

When they examined the survey results, the researchers found that the more hours spent watching these online original series, the more likely it was that the viewer saw the world as a mean and scary place. The results were published in the journal Psychology of Popular Media Culture.
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“Try to engage critically with what you’re watching. Try to think about: Who made this? Why? What is the purpose?” Krongard suggested.(IANS)

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SC Notice to Centre on Content Streamed by Online Platforms

Unlike the apex court, the High Court did not issue notice on the NGO’s petition but had only sought the government’s response

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A gardener works on the lawns of the Supreme Court in New Delhi, India, Aug. 22, 2017. VOA

The Supreme Court on Friday asked the Centre to respond on a plea seeking guidelines on the regulation of uncertified and sexually explicit content being streamed on global online platforms such as Netflix and Amazon Prime Video.

A bench of Chief Justice Ranjan Gogoi and Justice Sanjiv Khanna issued notice after hearing the petitioner. Earlier, the plea was dismissed by the Delhi High Court on February 8. The petitioner had moved the apex court challenging the High Court order.

The petitioner, Justice for Rights Foundation through its advocate H.S. Hora stated that online streaming platforms do not have a licence to function, and the same argument was accepted by the ministries concerned in their response on the plea in the High Court.

According to the petitioner, the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting had said that for these streaming platforms, it is not mandatory to get a licence from the ministry. Later, the High Court dismissed the petition.

The plea said: “The said online platforms are displaying unlicensed, unregulated, uncertified content and collecting subscription amounts from Indian consumers whereas the content telecast on the online platforms is illegal to the extent that certain movies are banned under the provisions of the Indian Cinematograph Act.”

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The new plans appearing on Netflix India’s website lists the weekly mobile-only plan for Rs 65, basic plan for Rs 125. Pixabay

Arguing in the High Court, the petitioner contended that series like “Sacred Games”, “Game of Thrones” and “Spartacus”, broadcast on platforms such as Netflix, contain sexually explicit content and depict women in objectionable manner.

The petitioner argues that the online content has not even passed by the Central Board for Film Certification.

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Unlike the apex court, the High Court did not issue notice on the NGO’s petition but had only sought the government’s response.

The NGO, in its petition in the High Court, had claimed that online media streaming platforms, including Hotstar, show content which is not regulated and also not even certified for broadcast in public. (IANS)