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“Never mind Brexit, who won Legs-it!” : UK tabloid’s front page slammed as “sexist and offensive”

The frontpage captioned “Never mind Brexit, who won Legs-it!”, appeared on Twitter on Monday night

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UK tabloid Daily Mail’s frontpage showing a photograph of Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon and British premier Theresa May
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London, March 28, 2017: UK tabloid Daily Mail’s frontpage showing a photograph of Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon and British premier Theresa May has been slammed as “sexist and offensive”, the media reported on Tuesday.

The frontpage captioned “Never mind Brexit, who won Legs-it!”, appeared on Twitter on Monday night, the Guardian reported.

Inside the paper there was more ogling at the female leaders, with a headline reading: “Finest weapons at their command? Those pins!”

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A column by Sarah Vine referred to Sturgeon’s legs as “altogether more flirty, tantalisingly crossed… a direct attempt at seduction”.

Among the first to criticise were Labour MPs Harriet Harman and Yvette Cooper.

Journalist Alastair Campbell, labelled the paper “utter scum” and urged anyone who spotted a copy of the Mail to rip it up, the Guardian reported.

The former Labour leader Ed Miliband tweeted: “The 1950s called and asked for their headline back”.

The front page, which referenced difficult talks between the leaders in Glasgow over Brexit, looked slightly different in Scotland, where it used the same photograph but with a headline that read: “Oh so frosty! Secrets of Nicola and PM’s talk-in”. (IANS)

 

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USA: Everything you want to know about Security Clearance; Find out here!

A security clearance allows a person access to classified national security information or restricted areas.

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Former CIA Director John O. Brennan speaks at the Council on Foreign Relations in Washington, March 11, 2014. President Donald Trump revoked Brennan's security clearance Wednesday. VOA
Former CIA Director John O. Brennan speaks at the Council on Foreign Relations in Washington, March 11, 2014. President Donald Trump revoked Brennan's security clearance Wednesday. VOA

U.S. President Donald Trump on Wednesday revoked the security clearance of former CIA Director John Brennan. We take a look at what that means.

What is a security clearance?

A security clearance allows a person access to classified national security information or restricted areas after completion of a background check. The clearance by itself does not guarantee unlimited access. The agency seeking the clearance must determine what specific area of information the person needs to access.

What are the different levels of security clearance?

There are three levels: Confidential, secret and top secret. Security clearances don’t expire. But, top secret clearances are reinvestigated every five years, secret clearances every 10 years and confidential clearances every 15 years.

All federal agencies follow a list of 13 potential justifications for revoking or denying a clearance. VOA
All federal agencies follow a list of 13 potential justifications for revoking or denying a clearance. VOA

Who has security clearances?

According to a Government Accountability Office report released last year, about 4.2 million people had a security clearance as of 2015, they included military personnel, civil servants, and government contractors.

Why does one need a security clearance in retirement?

Retired senior intelligence officials and military officers need their security clearances in case they are called to consult on sensitive issues.

Also Read: Governments Across The World Request Apple for 30,000 Device Information

Can the president revoke a security clearance?

Apparently. But there is no precedent for a president revoking someone’s security clearance. A security clearance is usually revoked by the agency that sought it for an employee or contractor. All federal agencies follow a list of 13 potential justifications for revoking or denying a clearance, which can include criminal acts, lack of allegiance to the United States, behavior or situation that could compromise an individual and security violations. (VOA)