Tuesday March 19, 2019
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New AirPod Case May ‘Wirelessly Charge’ iPhones Too

The development would add to Apple's much-anticipated "AirPower wireless charging mat" that was unveiled last year

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Apple
Apple lowers Q1 revenue guidance on slow iPhone sales.

Apple may roll out a new “charging case” for its AirPods that can “wirelessly charge” iPhones as well, the media reported.

“The product could be available as soon as the end of this year, however, the schedule is still subject to change,” Nikkei Asian Review reported, quoting an industry source familiar with the plan.

The development would add to Apple’s much-anticipated “AirPower wireless charging mat” that was unveiled last year.

Apple
Representational image. Pixabay

“Recent reports have suggested a September release of Apple’s ‘AirPower charging pad’ , which is around the time Apple typically announces its latest iPhone models each year,” Engadget reported recently.

The iPhone maker had previously mentioned that it would be working on a “wireless charging case” for “AirPods” that could also be topped up with the “AirPower pad”, though it gave no further details.

Also Read: Apple Launches its Free Schoolwork App For Teachers

“Apple did not respond to Nikkei Asian Review’s request for comment,” the report added.

Last year, the Cupertino-based company had said that the iPhone 8 range and later models would have wireless charging capabilities. (IANS)

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Apple Watch Can Detect And Notify Users Irregular Heart Rhythms

The results of the Apple Heart Study highlight the role that innovative digital technology can play in creating more predictive and preventive health care," said Lloyd Minor of the Stanford School of Medicine. 

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The study is expected to play a crucial role in the future stability research of PSCs. Pixabay

Apple Watch can detect and notify users when they experience irregular heart rhythms, finds a study demonstrating the ability of wearable technology to detect atrial fibrillation.

In 2017, Apple had partnered with researchers from the Stanford University and launched an app called “Apple Heart Study” to determine whether a mobile app that uses data from a heart rate pulse sensor on the Apple Watch can identify atrial fibrillation.

Atrial fibrillation, a deadly and often undiagnosed condition, can lead to strokes. The condition often remains hidden because many people do not experience symptoms.

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Comparisons between irregular pulse-detection on Apple Watch and simultaneous electrocardiography patch recordings showed the pulse detection algorithm has 71 per cent positive predictive value. Pixabay

The findings showed only 0.5 per cent participants received irregular pulse notifications, an important finding given the concerns about potential over-notification.

Eighty-four per cent of the time participants who received irregular pulse notifications were found to be in atrial fibrillation at the time of the notification and 34 per cent who followed up by using an ECG patch over a week later were found to have atrial fibrillation.

“The results of the Apple Heart Study highlight the role that innovative digital technology can play in creating more predictive and preventive health care,” said Lloyd Minor of the Stanford School of Medicine.

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“The performance and accuracy we observed in this study provides important information as we seek to understand the potential impact of wearable technology on the health system,” noted Marco Perez, Associate Professor of cardiovascular medicine at Stanford. Pixabay

“Atrial fibrillation is just the beginning, as this study opens the door to further research into wearable technologies and how they might be used to prevent disease before it strikes — a key goal of precision health,” Minor said.

Also Read: Study Reveals Solar Cells Can Retain Most Of Their Power Conversion Efficiency in Near Space

Comparisons between irregular pulse-detection on Apple Watch and simultaneous electrocardiography patch recordings showed the pulse detection algorithm has 71 per cent positive predictive value.

“The performance and accuracy we observed in this study provides important information as we seek to understand the potential impact of wearable technology on the health system,” noted Marco Perez, Associate Professor of cardiovascular medicine at Stanford. (IANS)