Wednesday April 8, 2020
Home Lead Story This new Defe...

This new Defence Tool May Help Fool Hackers

The approach aims to solve a major challenge to using artificial intelligence (AI) for cybersecurity

0
//
Cybersecurity
The approach aims to solve a major challenge to using artificial intelligence (AI) for cybersecurity: a shortage of data needed to train computers to detect intruders. Pixabay

Instead of blocking hackers, the researchers have created a new cybersecurity defence approach, which involves setting traps for hackers.

The method, called DEEP-Dig (DEcEPtion DIGging), ushers intruders into a decoy site so the computer can learn from hackers’ tactics. The information is then used to train the computer to recognise and stop future attacks. DEEP-Dig advances a rapidly growing cybersecurity field known as deception technology, which involves setting traps for hackers.

“There are criminals trying to attack our networks all the time, and normally we view that as a negative thing, instead of blocking them, maybe what we could be doing is viewing these attackers as a source of free labour,” said study researcher Kevin Hamlen from University of Texas in Dallas, US. “They’re providing us data about what malicious attacks look like. It’s a free source of highly prised data,” Hamlen added.

The approach aims to solve a major challenge to using artificial intelligence (AI) for cybersecurity: a shortage of data needed to train computers to detect intruders. The lack of data is due to privacy concerns. Better data will mean better ability to detect attacks, the researchers said.

“We’re using the data from hackers to train the machine to identify an attack, we’re using deception to get better data,” said study researcher Gbadebo Ayoade. Hackers typically begin with their simplest tricks and then use increasingly sophisticated tactics, the researchers said.

But most cyberdefense programmes try to disrupt intruders before anyone can monitor the intruders’ techniques. DEEP-Dig will give researchers a window into hackers’ methods as they enter a decoy site stocked with disinformation.

The decoy site looks legitimate to intruders and attackers will feel they’re successful, said study researcher Latifur Khan. As hackers’ tactics change, DEEP-Dig could help cybersecurity defence systems keep up with their new tricks.

Hackers
Instead of blocking hackers, the researchers have created a new cybersecurity defence approach, which involves setting traps for hackers. Pixabay

According to the researchers, while DEEP-Dig aims to outsmart hackers, it might be possible that hackers could have the last laugh if they realise they have entered a decoy site and try to deceive the programme.

“So far, we’ve found this doesn’t work. When an attacker tries to play along, the defence system just learns how hackers try to hide their tracks, it’s an all-win situation — for us, that is,” Hamlen said.

ALSO READ: Lenovo Retains its Dominance Over Tablet Market in India With 37% Market Share

The study was presented at the annual Computer Security Applications Conference in December in Puerto Rico. (IANS)

Next Story

Most Organisations Experience Cyber Threats During Coronavirus Pandemic: Checkpoint Survey

Cybercriminals will always seek to capitalise on the latest trends to try and boost the success rates of attacks, and the coronavirus pandemic has created a perfect storm of a global news event together with dramatic changes in working practices and the technologies used by organisations

0
Cyber Threat
In phishing attacks, a bad actor steals sensitive information by tricking people to open an email, instant message, or text message containing malicious links or attachments. Pixabay

 Most organisations have seen a rise in security threats and attacks during the coronavirus pandemic, a new survey by cybersecurity firm Check Point said on Tuesday.

While 71 per cent of those IT and security professionals who were surveyed reported an increase in security threats or attacks, 61 per cent of respondents said they were concerned about security risks of changes made to enable remote work.

Phishing attempts (55 per cent) and websites claiming helpful information on coronavirus (32 per cent) have emerged as the leading threats to the organisations, the respondents said. In phishing attacks, a bad actor steals sensitive information by tricking people to open an email, instant message, or text message containing malicious links or attachments.

Please Follow NewsGram on Twitter To Get Latest Updates From Around The World!

The findings showed that the rapid changes to enterprise working practices, and broader concerns about the pandemic, are both being exploited by cybercriminals as they step up their attacks, generating a raft of new challenges for security professionals.

“Cybercriminals will always seek to capitalise on the latest trends to try and boost the success rates of attacks, and the coronavirus pandemic has created a perfect storm of a global news event together with dramatic changes in working practices and the technologies used by organisations,” said Rafi Kretchmer Check Point’s Head of Product Marketing.

Cybersecurity
Most organisations have seen a rise in security threats and attacks during the coronavirus pandemic, a new survey by cybersecurity firm Check Point said on Tuesday. Pixabay

“This has meant a significant increase in the attack surface of many organizations, which is compromising their security postures. To ensure security and business continuity in this rapidly evolving situation, organizations need to protect themselves with a holistic, end-to-end security architecture,” Kretchmer added.

The survey was conducted in a bid to examine the severity of impact coronavirus has had on enterprise security. It involved 411 IT and security professions — all from organisations over 500 people. As many enterprises rely on Zoom to facilitate their employees working from home, Check Point recently saw a spike in the number of “Zoom” domains registered and spotted malicious “Zoom” files targeting people working from home.

ALSO READ: Are Women Better Drivers Than Men? Read This Article to Know More

Check Point documented 1,700 new “Zoom” domains registered since the advent of pandemic, 25 per cent of which were registered in the past week days, and has deemed 70 domains as suspicious. (IANS)