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New evidence points to an 850 years old Jain temple in Telangana

The inscriptions indicate that Malhar mandal in Karimnagar district was the last Jain temple in the region, also pointing out the patronage of the religion, 850 years ago

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  • Chepyala Madhusudhan Rao, an elder in the village, brought the discovery of the inscription to the notice of the historian, Dyaavanapalli Satyanarayana recently
  • The inscriptions have several contexts that serve as chronicles of the history of Telangana
  • The inscriptions in Sanskrit and Telugu say that the temple was constructed for the 24th  Jain Thirthankara- Sri Vardhamana Mahaveera

According to an article published in The Hindu, some farmers of Mallaram in Karimnagar district found a three-faced stone inscription as they were clearing shrubs to reclaim land. That was 8 years back. Chepyala Madhusudhan Rao, an elder in the village, brought it to the notice of the historian, Dyaavanapalli Satyanarayana recently and thus its importance was recognised.

According to the findings that have been revealed now, here are some interesting facts:

  •  Mr. Satyanarayana says that he had corroborated its content with facts in contemporary historical texts and thought it was fit to reveal the findings.
  •  The inscriptions have several contexts that serve as chronicles of the history of Telangana, opines the historian to the Hindu.
  •  The inscriptions indicate that Mallaram of Malhar mandal in Karimnagar district was the last Jain temple in the region, also pointing out the patronage of the religion to date back to 850 years.

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  •  The inscriptions in Sanskrit and Telugu say that the temple was constructed for the 24th  Jain Thirthankara- Sri Vardhamana Mahaveera- by Manikya Setti and also how the whole revenue of an entire village called Muppayapalli was donated by Bhaktula Pochenayudu for its maintenance.
  • Then it demarcates a line for the disappearance of Jainism and being replaced by a new religious sect called ‘Veera Saivism’ here.

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The stone inscription found at Mallaram village in Karimnagar district. Image Source: The Hindu
The stone inscription found at Mallaram village in Karimnagar district. Image Source: The Hindu
  •  The predominance of the Setti community (Komati today) among the Jains of those days was also mentioned.
  •  Inscription indicates that women were valued in those days. Giri Devasani, a lady mentioned in the inscriptions, is said to have succeeded her father Doddalasiddhi Setti as the chief priest of the Parshavanatha temple. Her sculpture has been found, in addition to the Kakatiya symbols of the ox and the sun-moon on all four sides of the stone.
  •  The mention of the lady reveals that women in the Jain faith held high position in their society, says Dr. Satyanarayana.

-prepared by Ajay Krishna, an intern at NewsGram.

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  • Vrushali Mahajan

    Very interesting to know about temples which are as old as 850 years

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Archaeological Sites Dating Back Thousands of Years Found Around Britain, Thanks to the Heat

The archaeologists are mapping the sites to determine the significance of the remains beneath and how best to protect them.

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A view shows parched grass from the lack of rain in Greenwich Park, backdropped by the Royal Museums Greenwich and the skyscrapers of the Canary Wharf business district, during what has been the driest summer for many years in London
A view shows parched grass from the lack of rain in Greenwich Park, backdropped by the Royal Museums Greenwich and the skyscrapers of the Canary Wharf business district, during what has been the driest summer for many years in London. VOA

Britain’s hottest summer in decades has revealed cropmarks across the country showing the archaeological sites of Iron Age settlements, Roman farms and even Neolithic monuments dating back thousands of years, archaeologists said Wednesday.

Cropmarks — patterns of shading in crops and grass seen most clearly from the air — form faster in hot weather as the fields dry out, making this summer’s heat wave ideal for discovering such sites.

Archaeologists at the public body Historic England have been making the most of the hot weather to look for patterns revealing the ancient sites buried below, from Yorkshire in the north down to Cornwall in the southwest.

Archeology , Neolithic artefacts. england
Neolithic remains (representational image). Wikimedia

“We’ve discovered hundreds of new sites this year spanning about 6,000 years of England’s history,” said Damian Grady, aerial reconnaissance manager at Historic England.

“Each new site is interesting in itself, but the fact we’re finding so many sites over such a large area is filling in a lot of gaps in knowledge about how people lived and farmed and managed the landscape in the past,” he said.

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The archaeologists are mapping the sites to determine the significance of the remains beneath and how best to protect them. While some may be significant enough to merit national protection from development, local authorities or farmers may be left to decide what to do at other sites.

“We’ll hopefully get the help of farmers to help protect some of these undesignated sites,” Grady said. (VOA)