Tuesday October 22, 2019
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New imaging system with ‘loose fibres’ developed

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Washington: A team of researchers from MIT which included an India-origin scientist developed a new imaging system that consists bundle of optical fibres and it does not have a need for lenses or a protective housing.

For medical applications, where the diameter of the bundle — and thus the number of fibers — needs to be low, the quality of the image could be improved through the use of interferometric methods.

The fibres are connected to an array of photosensors at one end and the other ends can be left to wave free so they could pass individually through micrometer-scale gaps in a porous membrane, to image whatever is on the other side.

Bundles of the fibres can be fed through pipes and immersed in fluids – to image oil fields, aquifers or plumbing without risking damage to watertight housings.

And tight bundles of the fibres could yield endoscopes with narrower diametres since they would require no additional electronics.

“Previous works have used time of flight to extract depth information. But in this work, I was proposing to use time of flight to enable a new interface for imaging,” explained Barmak Heshmat, a postdoc at MIT Media Lab.

Heshmat is the first author on the paper, joined by associate professor of media arts and sciences Ramesh Raskar and Ik Hyun Lee, a fellow postdoc.

The researchers reported the results in the journal Nature Scientific Reports.(IANS)

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10x Blacker Material Than Anything Reported By MIT Engineers

Engineers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have created a material that they claim is 10 times blacker than anything

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MIT, Engineers, Black material, Science
The dome at the MIT campus. Wikimedia Commons

Engineers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have created a material that they claim is 10 times blacker than anything that has previously been reported.

The material is made from vertically aligned carbon nanotubes, or CNTs — microscopic filaments of carbon that the team grew on a surface of chlorine-etched aluminum foil.

The foil captures more than 99.96 per cent of any incoming light, making it the blackest material on record, according to a study published in the journal ACS-Applied Materials and Interfaces.

MIT, Engineers, Black material, Science
Our material is 10 times blacker than anything that’s ever been reported. Pixabay

The material may be useful, for instance in optical blinders that reduce unwanted glare, to help space telescopes spot orbiting exoplanets, said Brian Wardle, Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics at the MIT.

ALSO READ: Electric Vehicle Maker Tesla Teases Model S with ‘Plaid Powertrain’

“There are optical and space science applications for very black materials, and of course, artists have been interested in black, going back well before the Renaissance.

“Our material is 10 times blacker than anything that’s ever been reported, but I think the blackest black is a constantly moving target. Someone will find a blacker material, and eventually we’ll understand all the underlying mechanisms, and will be able to properly engineer the ultimate blac,” he added. (IANS)