Monday January 21, 2019

New innovative technology in Myanmar : Making big Gong

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https://youtu.be/T8pSZmacses

Mandalay, Myanmar: When the copper prices soared to new heights, the Gong makers of Thailand and Myanmar finally decided to make it shift from the bronze to that of the iron age.

We are talking about the Gongs which are used in various Buddhist monasteries throughout Asia. The craftsmen decided to counter the problem by inventing a large iron disk which resonates with the right pitch.

Than Zaw, a gong maker says that as people demanded bigger gongs with right sounds, the craftsmen began the innovative technique of casting the iron metal into the giant gongs.

While another gong maker, Zin Min, is of the opinion that though machines will make it look smoother for the gongs, it will only be able to reproduce the sounds like hitting an iron or a bronze plate. He adds that unfortunately, machinery fails to create the pitch and beats for a gong to properly work.

The Mandalay craftsmen, believes that their technology is able to invent a gong that will be as large as having a total diameter of 5 meters. Whereas, currently the largest iron gong in production is about 3 meters in diameter and weights a total of 245 kilograms. And the thing is, it will be deal with an impressive price of 2900 dollars.

Lastly, in the words of Panna Jota, who had traveled some 600 kilometers, to purchase modestly sized gongs proudly tells: “Long ago  our warriors going into the battle will become energized by the sounds of the gongs and will fight to win. And that’s why it is for us the sound of success and victory.” (This news is brought to you by  NewsGram in collaboration with Voice of America.)

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Amnesty International Accuses India Of Disregarding National Law After It Deports A Rohingya Family

Around 18,000 Rohingya in India are registered with the United Nations refugee agency.

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Amnesty, Rohingya
Members of a Muslim Rohingya family sit as they pose for a photograph with Indian and Myanmar security officials before their deportation on India-Myanmar border at Moreh in the northeastern state of Manipur, India, Jan. 3, 2019. VOA

Amnesty International on Monday accused India of disregarding international law after a Rohingya family was deported to Myanmar where the military is accused of genocide against the stateless Muslim minority.

The family of five, who had been in prison in India’s northeastern Assam state since 2013, was handed over to Myanmar authorities on Thursday — the second such deportation in just months after seven men were returned in October.

The United Nations expressed concern over the forcible repatriation of the Rohingya while rights groups warned New Delhi was putting the community at serious risk by returning them to Myanmar, where for decades the minority has been targeted in violent pogroms by security forces.

Rohingya, india
Rohingya women and children are seen at a temporary shelter in the Kalindi Kunj area of New Delhi, India, April 15, 2018. VOA

The Rohingya are despised by many in Buddhist-majority Myanmar, which refuses to recognize them as citizens and falsely labels them “Bengali” illegal immigrants.

They were concentrated in Rakhine state, the epicentre of a Myanmar army offensive that since August 2017 has driven some 720,000 Rohingya Muslims into Bangladesh.

“The Rohingya population in Rakhine state in Myanmar continue to live under a system of apartheid,” Amnesty India’s Abhirr V. P. said in a statement.

“The expulsion of asylum-seekers and refugees amounts to a violation of India’s obligations under customary international law, which prohibits governments from returning people to a territory where they are at risk of serious human rights violations.”

Rohingya, Drinking water, amnesty
Formin Akter applies makeup before heading to Chittagong to attend school at the Asian University for Women in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, Aug. 24, 2018. VOA

India is not a signatory to the UN Refugee Convention.

Indian officials say around 40,000 Rohingya are living in the country, where Hindu hardliners have called for their mass deportation.

Also Read: Second Group Of Rohingya Muslims Get Deported By India

Around 18,000 Rohingya in India are registered with the United Nations refugee agency.

UNHCR said despite repeated requests they were not granted access to the Rohingya family detained in Assam before their deportation.

India’s home ministry told parliament last week that 478 Rohingya were arrested between 2015 and 2018, with last year topping the list with 230 detentions along the nation’s borders. (VOA)

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