Thursday January 23, 2020

New Reusable Device Which can Help Women with Breast Cancer in Lower-Income Countries

Innovation in cancer care doesn't always mean that you have to create an entirely new treatment

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Breast Cancer, Device, Women
According to the study published in the journal PLOS One, the research team wanted to create a tissue-freezing tool that uses carbon dioxide. Pixabay

Researchers have developed a new reusable device which can help women with breast cancer in lower-income countries by using carbon dioxide, a widely available and affordable gas, to power a cancer tissue-freezing probe instead of industry-standard argon.

According to the study published in the journal PLOS One, the research team wanted to create a tissue-freezing tool that uses carbon dioxide, which is already widely available in most rural areas thanks to the popularity of carbonated drinks.

“Innovation in cancer care doesn’t always mean that you have to create an entirely new treatment. Sometimes it means radically innovating on proven therapies such that they’re redesigned to be accessible to the majority of the world’s population,” said the study’s first author Bailey Surtees from the Johns Hopkins University.

For the study, the research team tested their tool in three experiments to ensure it could remain cold enough in conditions similar to the human breast and successfully kill tumour tissues.

Breast Cancer, Device, Women
Researchers have developed a new reusable device which can help women with breast cancer in lower-income countries by using carbon dioxide. Pixabay

In the first experiment, the team used the tool on jars of ultrasound gel, which thermodynamically mimics human breast tissue, to determine whether it could successfully reach standard freezing temperatures killing tissues and form consistent iceballs.

In all the trials, the device formed large enough iceballs and reached temperatures below -40 degrees Celsius, which meets standard freezing temperatures for tissue death for similar devices in the United States.

For the second experiment, the team treated 9 rats with 10 mammary tumours. Afterwards, they looked at the tissues under a microscope and confirmed that the tool successfully killed 85 per cent or more tissues for all tumours.

Finally, the team tested the tool’s ability to reach temperatures cold enough for tissue destruction in the normal liver of a pig, which has a temperature similar to a human breast.

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The device was successfully able to stay cold enough during the entire experiment to kill the target tissue. (IANS)

Next Story

Apple To Start Production of Low-Cost iPhone Soon

Planning for the new handset was reported in September by Japanese news outlet Nikkei Asian Review

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Apple
Apple is reportedly ready to return to the low-cost phone market after an absence of four years. Pixabay

The low cost successor to iPhone SE is getting into mass production next month and Apple could release it in March.

Apple is reportedly ready to return to the low-cost phone market after an absence of four years, CNET reported on Tuesday.

The handset — believed to be comparable in size to the 4.7-inch iPhone 8 from 2017 — would be Apple’s first low-cost smartphone since 2016’s $399 iPhone SE.

It is pertinent to note that the iPhone SE was one of company’s most successful mobile devices in the past half-decade because of a combination of reasons.

Price was a factor but it also offered long-time iPhone fans a reprieve from all the design changes that Apple was doing.

Apple
The low cost successor to iPhone SE is getting into mass production next month and Apple could release it in March. Pixabay

Planning for the new handset was reported in September by Japanese news outlet Nikkei Asian Review.

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The phone will share most components with the current line up of iPhones and use a cheaper LCD display to keep the cost low, according to the Japanese paper, the CNET report added. (IANS)