Monday June 25, 2018
Home Lead Story Best time to ...

Best time to learn new skills may develop during teenage years

0
//
209
Teenage years are the best time to learn and develop new skills.
Teenage years are the best time to learn and develop new skills. wikimedia commons
Republish
Reprint

London, Dec 24, 2017: While a person can never be old enough to learn a new skill, teenage years can make learning easier. It is because the brain reacts more responsively to receiving rewards during adolescence, finds a study. Teenage years have been known to be inextricably linked to alcohol abuse, reckless behaviour and poor choice in friends.

This is due in part to increased activity in the corpus striatum — a small area deeply hidden away inside the brain. However, the new study showed that this increased activity in the corpus striatum does not have only negative consequences. “The adolescent brain is very sensitive to feedback,” said Sabine Peters, Assistant Professor at the Leiden University in the Netherlands.

“That makes adolescence the ideal time to acquire and retain new information,” Peters added. For the study, published in Nature Communications, the team involved 300 subjects between the ages of 8 and 29 and took MRI scans of their brains, for over a period of five years.

In the MRI scanner, participants had to solve a memory game, while the researchers gave feedback on the participants’ performance. The results showed that adolescents responded keenly to educational feedback. If the adolescent received useful feedback, then you saw the corpus striatum being activated. This was not the case with less pertinent feedback, for example, if the test person already knew the answer, the researchers said.

“The stronger your brain recognises that difference, the better the performance in the learning task. Brain activation could even predict learning performance two years into the future,” Peters said. (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2017 NewsGram

Next Story

Study Shows, Memory Loss in Old Age is Not Triggered by Sexual Intimacy

Getting naughty under the sheets as well as remaining emotionally attached to romantic partners in old age may not be linked to decline in memory skills, finds a study.

0
Participants completed an episodic memory task and a questionnaire where they reported the frequency of intimate activities such as kissing, sexual touching and intercourse.
Old Couple. pixabay

Getting naughty under the sheets as well as remaining emotionally attached to romantic partners in old age may not be linked to declining in memory skills, finds a study.

Although lifestyle factors, level of education, smoking and drinking habits and physical activity all play a role in the rate and extent of the age-related cognitive decline, the study now shows that there is no link between sexual activity and rate of cognitive decline.

 

Participants completed an episodic memory task and a questionnaire where they reported the frequency of intimate activities such as kissing, sexual touching and intercourse.v
representational image. pixabay

 

“Decline in memory performance over time was unrelated to sexual activity or emotional closeness during partnered sexual activity,” said Mark Allen of the University of Wollongong in Australia.

For the study, published in the journal Archives of Sexual Behavior, the team used data from more than 6,000 adults aged 50 and over.

Participants completed an episodic memory task and a questionnaire where they reported the frequency of intimate activities such as kissing, sexual touching, and intercourse.

Allen found an overall decline in all participants’ score on the memory test over time.

Further, the study builds on previous experimental work that showed sexual activity enhances elderly rodents’ ability to recognize objects and, therefore, ultimately their episodic memory workings and overall brain health.

Also Read: Older Employees Are More Likely to Get Affected by Unfair Treatment at Workplace

It stimulated the growth of neurons in the hippocampus, a part of the brain that is activated when episodic and spatial memory tasks are performed. (IANS)

Next Story