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New Study Suggests Living Near Parks and Nature Linked to Greater Happiness

Parks near home good for your mental health

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Green space within 300 metres of home had the greatest influence on mental well-being. Pixabay

Living within 300 metres of urban green space such as parks, nature reserves or play areas is associated with greater happiness, sense of worth and life satisfaction, says a new study.

Using data from UK government’s Annual Population Survey (APS) of 25,518 people, the researchers show that people who live within 300 metres of green space have significantly better mental well-being.

“A lot of research focuses on poor mental health, or single aspects of well-being like life satisfaction. What makes our work different is the way we consider multi-dimensional mental well-being in terms of happiness, life satisfaction and worth,” said Victoria Houlden from the University of Warwick.

The study, published in the journal Applied Geography, found that there is a very strong relationship between the amount of green space around a person’s home and their feelings of life satisfaction, happiness, and self-worth.

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The study found that proximity to green space was more important than lifestyle factors such as employment, income and general health. Pixabay

Green space within 300 metres of home had the greatest influence on mental well-being.

The study found that proximity to green space was more important than lifestyle factors such as employment, income and general health.

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“By combining advanced statistical and mapping methods, we’ve shown that the effect is real and substantial. Basically we’ve proven what everyone has always assumed was true,” said Scott Weich, Professor at the University of Sheffield. (IANS)

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Top Priority In Any Relationship Is Kindness, Study Suggests

One of the top qualities that people look for in a long-term relationship is kindness, research suggests

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While traits like physical attractiveness and financial prospects were important, the one that was given the highest priority was kindness. Pixabay

One of the top qualities that people look for in a long-term relationship is kindness, a new research suggests.

For the study published in the Journal of Personality, the research team picked over 2,700 college students from across the globe and asked them to build themselves an ideal lifelong partner by using a fixed budget to ‘buy’ characteristics.

While traits like physical attractiveness and financial prospects were important, the one that was given the highest priority was kindness, said the researchers.

“Looking at very different culture groups allows us to test the idea that some behaviours are human universals. If men and women act in a similar way across the globe, then this adds weight to the idea that some behaviours develop in spite of culture rather than because of it,” said study principle researcher Andrew G. Thomas from Swansea University in Britain.

The study compared the dating preferences of students from Eastern countries including Singapore, Malaysia and Hong Kong, and Western countries such as the UK, Norway and Australia.

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Students were given eight attributes they could spend ‘mate dollars’ on physical attractiveness, good financial prospects, kindness, humour, chastity, religiosity, the desire for children and creativity.
Pixabay

Students were given eight attributes they could spend ‘mate dollars’ on physical attractiveness, good financial prospects, kindness, humour, chastity, religiosity, the desire for children and creativity.

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People typically spent 22-26 per cent of their total budget on kindness and large parts of their budget on physical attractiveness and good financial prospects, while traits like creativity and chastity received less than 10 per cent.

The results also showed a difference in a partner’s desire for children, which was a priority only for Western women. (IANS)