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Night time Munchers, You are Risking your Skin!

Abnormal eating schedule especially eating during night time makes one more prone to skin diseases

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People who eat late at night are more vulnerable to sunburn and longer-term effects such as skin aging and skin cancer. Pixabay

Washington D.C. [USA], August 17, 2017: Night time munchers, hold on tight! This jaw-dropping finding may encourage you to give up your night time muncher title.

According to researcher Joseph S. Takahashi, people who eat late at night are more vulnerable to sunburn and longer-term effects such as skin aging and skin cancer.

You will be surprized to know that more than sunbathing or sun exposure, it is your irregular eating habits which deeply hamper your skin.

The effects of the disturbance in the biological cycle of the skin due to the irregular eating schedule are demonstrated and verified by O’Donnell Brain Institute and UC Irvine. A study was conducted on mice as they are nocturnal animals. Therefore, their natural eating time is at night. During the study, Takahashi fed the mice during the day time and observed the effects of irregular eating habits on the skin, mentioned ANI report.

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The outcome demonstrated an alteration in the XPA(Xeroderma Pigmentosum group-A) cycles. XPA is an enzyme that repairs the UV damaged skin. As a consequence of which, these mice suffered more skin damage when exposed to ultraviolet B(UVB) light as compared to those mice, which were fed at their original eating time. Apart from altered XPA cycles, the study also found that abnormal eating schedules affect the expression of about 10% of the skin’s genes.

It is primarily the irregular eating habits which disturb the biological cycle of the skin. It thus diminishes the daytime potency of an enzyme that provides a protection against the sun’s harmful UV radiation.

Don’t be afraid to go for sun basking on a beach, just regulate your eating schedule so as to attain a strong skin immunity system.

– prepared by a Staff Writer of NewsGram

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People with High Vitamin A Intake at Lower Risk of Skin Cancer

Vitamin A is known to be essential for the healthy growth and maturation of skin cells but prior studies on its effectiveness in reducing skin cancer risk have shown mixed results

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skin cancer, vitamin a
Vitamin A is known to be essential for the healthy growth and maturation of skin cells but prior studies on its effectiveness in reducing skin cancer risk have shown mixed results. Pixabay

Researchers have found that people who intake high levels of Vitamin A were 17 per cent less at risk of getting a skin cancer as compared to those who ate modest amounts of foods and supplements rich in Vitamin A.

“Our study provides another reason to eat lots of fruits and vegetables as part of a healthy diet. Skin cancer, including squamous cell carcinoma, is hard to prevent, but this study suggests that eating a healthy diet rich in Vitamin A, in addition to wearing sunscreen and reducing sun exposure, may be a way to reduce the risk,” said Eunyoung Cho, Associate Professor at the Brown University.

Vitamin A is known to be essential for the healthy growth and maturation of skin cells but prior studies on its effectiveness in reducing skin cancer risk have shown mixed results. In the study published in the Journal of American Medical Association Dermatology, the researchers analysed data from two long-term observational studies in which 121,700 US women were followed from 1984 to 2012 and 51,529 US men from 1986 to 2012.

cancer, vitamin A
Participants’ hair colour, the number of severe sunburns they had received in their lifetime and any family history of skin cancer were also taken into account. Pixabay

The research team looked at the diet and skin cancer results of the participants. Between the two studies, around 123,000 participants were white (and thus had a significant risk of developing skin cancer), had no prior history of cancer and completed the dietary reports multiple times.

A total of 3,978 cases of squamous cell carcinoma were reported and verified within the 24 to 26 year follow-up periods. Participants’ hair colour, the number of severe sunburns they had received in their lifetime and any family history of skin cancer were also taken into account.

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After grouping the participants into five categories by their Vitamin A intake levels, the researchers found that people in the category with the highest average daily total Vitamin A intake were 17 per cent less likely to get skin cancer than those in the category with the lowest total Vitamin A intake.

The team also found that the majority of Vitamin A came from the participants’ diets, particularly from fruits and vegetables, rather than from animal-based foods or vitamin supplements. (IANS)