Monday September 23, 2019
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No Definition Of Green-Firecrackers, Probably Too Late To Put A Check: Environmentalists

Post-Diwali PM10 levels in Pitampura area was 690 units in 2017 against over 1,000 units in 2016.

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Fireworks, environmentalists
The ban would be in force throughout the year. These conditions would also be applicable to marriage festivities. Pixabay

While welcoming the Supreme Court’s verdict on imposing certain restriction on the timing of bursting firecrackers, environmentalists say there is no definition of green firecrackers, while raising scepticism if this will work this Diwali which is merely two weeks away.

The SC on Tuesday refused to impose a blanket ban on firecrackers, but restricted bursting only “green firecrackers” between 8 p.m. and 10 p.m.

Pointing out that the peak smog episode of Delhi in 2016 and 2017 was around November 7 and November 8 due to the combined effect of stubble burning in neighbouring states, the date this year collides with Diwali on November 7, 2018.

While some environment organizations and environmentalists welcomed the decision, they pointed out the need for round-the-year imposition and check on other sources of pollution occuring from vehicles, industries and stubble burning.

 

environmentalists
People using Firecrackers to celebrate Diwali. Flickrfirecracker

“Issue of concept of green fire crackers, with limited amount of noise and emissions, had been raised in green courts earlier, but such things practically don’t exist in our country. PESO, however, can mark a warning system on firecrackers, but it’s too late for this Diwali,” says environment activist Vikrant Tongad.

Many activists believe that while stockpiling of firecrackers would have already been done, it would be extremenly difficult to check the standards of firecrackers.

PESO or the Petroleum and Explosives Safety Organisation is the nodal organisation to look after safety requirements in manufacture, storage, transport and use of explosives and petroleum. Supereme Court on Tuesday asked it to review the clinical composition of fireworks, particularly for reducing the aluminium content and submit its report within two weeks.

“The stubble burning is at peak right now and last year, Diwali was on October 19 and in 2016 it was on October 30. This time it’s at the time when Delhi has a history of suffering smog episode. Also, there is no concept of green firecracker, so SC’s verdict is not likely to help,” an environment researcher told IANS requesting anonymity.

Firecrackers, environmentalists
SC permits bursting of only green firecrackers. Pixabay

The expert also pointed out that since the SC had allowed bursting firecrackers for two hours, imposing the restriction would be difficult.

In 2016, PM2.5 or particles with diameter less than 2.5mm, levels in some areas of Delhi increased to 1,238 on Diwali, which was about 50 times higher than the international standards. However, this effect was reduced in Diwali 2017 following a blanket ban, according to a Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB) report. Another post-Diwali assessment across four regions in Delhi found drop in levels of suphur, nitrous and particle pollution in 2017 as compared to 2016.

For instance, post-Diwali PM10 levels in Pitampura area was 690 units in 2017 against over 1,000 units in 2016.

Also Read: Indian Supreme Court Allows Only Green Firecrackers

a Greenpeace assessment had found that average PM 2.5 levels post-Diewali in 2017 were 181 microgram per cubic meters, which were 343 units in 2016.

“Like the issue of burning biomass, fire crackers too contribute only to peak episodes and has little to do with sources that pollute the air during most parts of the year.

“We have been witnessing the lack of seriousness shown to this public health crisis by both central and state governments in policy formulation and implementation for many years now,” said Sunil Dahiya, Senior Campaigner, Greenpeace India. (IANS)

Next Story

G20 Nations Unable To Meet Paris Agreement On Climate Action

G20 nations are collectively not on track to meet their Paris Agreement commitments, but they have huge opportunities to undertake rapid and deep cuts to greenhouse gas emissions

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G20 Summit, climate action, Paris, agreement, climate
Ministers and delegates gather for a family photo session at G20 energy and environment ministers meeting in Karuizawa, Japan, June 15, 2019, in this photo taken by Kyodo. VOA

G20 nations are collectively not on track to meet their Paris Agreement commitments, but they have huge opportunities to undertake rapid and deep cuts to greenhouse gas emissions, a new UN research has said.

An advance chapter of the 2019 Emissions Gap Report, released on Saturday ahead of the UN Secretary-General’s Climate Action Summit slated to open on Monday, has said that the G20 members, which account for around 80 per cent of global greenhouse gas emissions, were not yet taking on transformative climate commitments at the necessary breadth and scale.

The report showed that around half of the G20 nations’ GHG emissions trajectories fall short of achieving their Nationally Determined Contributions (NDC) under the 2015 Paris Climate Change Agreement.

Taken as a whole, the current NDCs are nowhere near enough to meet the 1.5 degrees Celsius or below two degrees temperature goals of the Paris Agreement.

This means that the world is still on the path to a catastrophic temperature rise of well over three degrees this century.

However, the advance chapter points to key areas where G20 nations can rapidly step up action when they submit their next round of NDCs in 2020.

G20 Summit, climate action, Paris, agreement, climate
Young people afraid for their futures protested around the globe Friday to implore leaders to tackle climate change, turning out by the hundreds of thousands to insist. Pixabay

“We can only avoid planet-altering climate change with the full commitment of G20 nations to a zero-carbon future. So far, they haven’t done enough” said UNEP Executive Director Inger Andersen.

“But the good news is that every G20 nation has an array of nationally appropriate actions available to them to slash their emissions. Combined with strong political and societal support for climate action, there has never been a better opportunity for policymakers to take these actions.”

The full Emissions Gap Report, due for release in late November, will contain a detailed G20 update.

ALSO READ: India To Become Global Steel Manufacturing Hub By 2031

The 2018 report said the G20 would need to cut an extra 2.5 gigatonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent per year by 2030 to meet their unconditional NDCs.

For conditional NDCs, the number is 3.5 gigatonnes.

According to the report, nations must at least triple the level of ambition of their current NDCs to have a chance of keeping global temperature rise under 2 degrees Celsius.

To keep global temperatures to 1.5 degrees, they must increase their ambitions five-fold. (IANS)