Friday March 22, 2019

According to Research, No Exercise For 6 Years Can Trigger Heart Failure Risk

Too busy or lazy to exercise? Men and women take note. Living without physical activity for six years during their middle age could be at an increased risk of suffering heart failure, researchers have warned.

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heart attack
representational image. pixabay

Too busy or lazy to exercise? Men and women take note. Living without physical activity for six years during their middle age could be at an increased risk of suffering heart failure, researchers have warned.

The findings, described in the journal Circulation, suggest that consistently participating in the recommended 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous activity each week, such as brisk walking or biking, in middle age can reduce the heart failure risk by 31 per cent.

While it is known that people who are more physically active have lower risks of heart failure than those who are less active, but little is known about the impact of changes in exercise levels over time on heart failure risk.

Heart
representational image. pixabay

 

“Going from no exercise to recommended activity levels over six years in middle age may reduce heart failure risk by 23 per cent,” said Chiadi Ndumele, Assistant Professor at the Johns Hopkins University in Maryland, US.

For the study, the team included 11,351 participants, with an average age 60, monitored annually for an average of 19 years.

According to the American Heart Association, the “recommended” amount is at least 75 minutes per week of vigorous intensity or at least 150 minutes per week of moderate intensity exercise.

Heart failure risk decreased by about 12 per cent in the participants who increased their physical activity category from poor to intermediate or recommended, or from intermediate to recommended, compared with those with consistently poor or intermediate activity ratings.

Representational image.
Heart failure risk decreased by about 12 percent of the participants who increased their physical activity. Pixabay

Conversely, heart failure risk increased by 18 percent in the participants who reported decreased physical activity from visit one to visit three, compared with those with consistently recommended or intermediate activity levels.

Unlike the heart attack, in which heart muscle dies, heart failure is marked by a long-term, chronic inability of the heart to pump enough blood, or pump it hard enough, to bring needed oxygen to the body.

Also Read: Drug Used For Osteoporosis May Help in Reducing Heart Attack Risk

The leading cause of hospitalizations in those over 65, the disorder’s risk factors include high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, smoking and a family history. (IANS)

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Exercise May Help You Counter Effects of Jet Lag

For the study, the team examined body clocks following exercise in 101 participants for up to five-and-a-half days

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Representational image.
representational image. Pixabay

Finding it hard to cope with jet lag, shift-based work? Doing some excercise can shift the human body clock and help you adjust to the shifted schedules, suggests new research.

The study, from the Arizona State University, showed that exercise can shift the human body clock with the direction and amount of this effect depending on the time of day or night in which people exercise.

Exercising at 7 a.m. or between 1 and 4 p.m. advanced the body clock to an earlier time, and exercising between 7 and 10 p.m. delayed the body clock to a later time.

Exercising between 1 and 4 a.m. and at 10 a.m., however, had little effect on the body clock, and the phase-shifting effects of exercise did not differ based on age or gender, the researchers explained.

“Exercise has been known to cause changes to our body clock. We were able to clearly show in this study when exercise delays the body clock and when it advances it,” said lead author Shawn Youngstedt, from the varsity.

Lemon
Exercise can help you counter effects of jet lag, shift-based work. Pixabay.

“This is the first study to compare exercise’s effects on the body clock, and could open up the possibility of using exercise to help counter the negative effects of jet lag and shift work.”

The findings, published in The Journal of Physiology, suggest exercise could counter the effects of jet lag, shift work, and other disruptions to the body’s internal clock (e.g., military deployments) helping individuals adjust to shifted schedules.

Also Read- Billion-Dollar Business Goes To The Dog Walkers

For the study, the team examined body clocks following exercise in 101 participants for up to five-and-a-half days.

The baseline timing of each participant’s body clock was determined from urine samples collected every 90 minutes to measure the time of the evening rise in melatonin and the peak of melatonin several hours later. (IANS)