Wednesday November 20, 2019
Home Lead Story No Gender Dif...

No Gender Difference In Brain Function: Study

No difference in brain activities among both boys and girls

0
//
Brain
the research team from Carnegie Mellon University comprehensively examined the brain development of young boys and girls. Pixabay

Researchers have found similar patterns of brain activity in both boys and girls as they engage in basic math problems.

For the study, published in the journal Science of Learning, the research team from Carnegie Mellon University comprehensively examined the brain development of young boys and girls.

Through brain imaging, their research shows no gender difference in brain function or math ability.

“We see that children’s brains function similarly regardless of their gender. So hopefully we can recalibrate expectations of what children can achieve in mathematics,” said study researcher Jessica Cantlon from Carnegie Mellon University in the US.

For the findings, Cantlon and her team conducted the first neuroimaging study to evaluate biological gender differences in the math aptitude of young children.

Her team used functional MRI to measure the brain activity in 104 young children (3-to 10-years-old; 55 girls) while watching an educational video covering early math topics, like counting and addition.

The researchers compared scans from the boys and girls to evaluate brain similarity.

In addition, the team examined brain maturity by comparing the children’s scans to those taken from a group of adults (63 adults; 25 women), who watched the same math videos.

After numerous statistical comparisons, they found no difference in the brain development of girls and boys.

Brain
Through brain imaging, research shows no gender difference in brain function or math ability. Pixabay

In addition, the researchers found no difference in how boys and girls processed math skills and were equally engaged while watching educational videos.

Finally, boys’ and girls’ brain maturity were statistically equivalent when compared to either men or women in the adult group.

The researchers also compared the results of the ‘Test of Early Mathematics Ability’, a standardised test for 3- to 8-year-old children, from 97 participants (50 girls) to gauge the rate of math development.

Also Read- My Little Genius: A Campaign To Focus On Kids’ Creativity

They found that math ability was equivalent among the children and did not show a difference in gender or with age. (IANS)

Next Story

40% Parents Struggle to see Depression Signs in Kids: Study

Most parents also believe schools should play a role in identifying potential depression, with seven in 10 supporting depression screening starting in middle school, the study said

0
In boys it is previous depressive symptoms which determine subsequent suicidal ideation. Pixabay

Telling the difference between a teen’s normal ups and downs or something bigger is among the top challenges parents face while identifying depression among the youth, says a new study.

Forty per cent of parents struggle to differentiate between normal mood swings and signs of depression, while 30 per cent are tricked as their child hides his/her feelings well, according to a new national poll in the US.

The C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll on Children’s Health at the University of Michigan, is based on responses from 819 parents with at least one child in middle school, junior high, or high school.

“In many families, the preteen and teen years bring dramatic changes both in youth behaviour and in the dynamic between parents and children,” said poll co-director Sarah Clark.

“These transitions can make it particularly challenging to get a read on children’s emotional state and whether there is possible depression,” Clark added.

According to the researchers, some parents might be overestimating their ability to recognise depression in the mood and behaviour of their own child.

An overconfident parent may fail to pick up on the subtle signals that something is amiss.

suicide, world, deaths, study
Depression is among the leading causes of disability in the U.S. and is being closely monitored by health authorities amid rising suicides nationwide. Pixabay

The poll also suggests that the topic of depression is all too familiar for middle and high school students.

One in four parents say their child knows a peer or classmate with depression, and one in 10 say their child knows a peer or classmate who has died by suicide.

This level of familiarity with depression and suicide is consistent with recent statistics showing a dramatic increase in suicide among US youth over the past decade.

Rising rates of suicide highlight the importance of recognising depression in youth.

Also Read: Study Finds No Link Between Fish Oil and Prostrate Cancer

Compared to the ratings of their own ability, parents polled were also less confident that their preteens or teens would recognise depression in themselves.

“Parents should stay vigilant on spotting any signs of potential depression in kids, which may vary from sadness and isolation to anger, irritability and acting out,” said Clark.

Most parents also believe schools should play a role in identifying potential depression, with seven in 10 supporting depression screening starting in middle school, the study said. (IANS)