Monday January 21, 2019

There’s No Healthy Level for Consuming Alcohol, Lancet Study Confirms

For people aged 50 and older, cancers were a leading cause of alcohol related death, constituting 27.1 per cent of deaths in women and 18.9 per cent deaths in men

0
//
drinking
Representational image. Pixabay

Contrary to claims that one or two glasses of wine a day keep you healthy, a study published in the prestigious journal The Lancet has warned that there is no safe level of drinking alcohol as it is associated with nearly one in 10 deaths among middle-aged people.

The findings showed that any health benefits of alcohol against heart disease and diabetes are outweighed by its adverse effects on other aspects of health, particularly cancers.

“The conclusions of the study are clear and unambiguous: alcohol is a colossal global health issue and small reductions in health-related harms at low levels of alcohol intake are outweighed by the increased risk of other health-related harms, including cancer,” said Robyn Burton, from the King’s College London.

Globally, one in three people (32.5 per cent) drink alcohol — equivalent to 2.4 billion people — including 25 per cent of women (0.9 billion women) and 39 per cent of men (1.5 billion men).

Consequently, 2.2 per cent of women and 6.8 per cent of men died from alcohol-related health problems each year.

“Policies focussing on reducing alcohol consumption to the lowest levels will be important to improve health.

Alcohol
Consequently, 2.2 per cent of women and 6.8 per cent of men died from alcohol-related health problems each year. Pixabay

“The widely held view of the health benefits of alcohol needs revising, particularly as improved methods and analyses continue to shed light on how much alcohol contributes to global death and disability,” said lead author Max Griswold, from the University of Washington in the US.

The Global Burden of Disease study estimated the level of alcohol use and health effects in 28 million people across 195 countries between 1990 and 2016.

For people aged 50 and older, cancers were a leading cause of alcohol related death, constituting 27.1 per cent of deaths in women and 18.9 per cent deaths in men.

Also Read- Google Brings Gmail’s Side Panel to G Suite Apps

“Worldwide we need to revisit alcohol control policies and health programmes, and to consider recommendations for abstaining from alcohol.

“These include excise taxes on alcohol, controlling the physical availability of alcohol and the hours of sale, and controlling alcohol advertising. Any of these policy actions would contribute to reductions in population-level consumption, a vital step toward decreasing the health loss associated with alcohol use,” the researchers said. (IANS)

Next Story

Social Media addiction Linked to Binge Drinking in Students

While college students' reliance on social media has been identified as a risk factor for alcohol-related problems, it might also present an opportunity for innovative interventions

0
Alcohol, drink
Middle-aged adults must have 'drink-free' days for healthy body. Pixabay

College students who binge drink frequently post on social media in an intoxicated condition and show signs of social media addiction, a new study has warned.

The findings suggested that when compared to those students who had never drink binged, those who did were more likely to have posted on any social media platform while drinking and while intoxicated.

“During these times when young students are feeling disinhibited by alcohol, they may be even more likely than usual to post inappropriate material without considering the future impact,” said lead author Natalie A. Ceballos from the Texas State University in San Marcos.

Drink
Binge drinkers also showed greater “intensity” towards social media. Pixabay

For the study, published in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, the research team recruited 425 undergraduate students aged between 18 and 25.

They asked about students’ alcohol use, including the quantity and frequency with which they drank and if they had ever “binged”.

The researchers also queried about students’ use of social media, including Snapchat, Instagram, Facebook and Twitter, and whether they posted social media messages while drinking and while intoxicated.

Social Media, digital, Encryption, drink
This photo taken March 22, 2018, shows apps for WhatsApp, Facebook, Instagram and other social networks on a smartphone. VOA

Students then were asked about their social media addiction — that is, if they experienced negative consequences from their social media use. Currently, however, there is no official psychiatric diagnosis of addiction to social media.

Binge drinkers also showed greater “intensity” towards social media (more emotional investment that allowed social media to become part of their identities) and a non-statistically significant trend towards being more addicted to social media.

They also used more social media platforms than non-binge drinkers.

However, social media also may prove to be an avenue for prevention efforts among student drinkers, the researcher said.

Also Read: Stimulating Brain Cells Stops Binge Drinking

“While college students’ reliance on social media has been identified as a risk factor for alcohol-related problems, it might also present an opportunity for innovative interventions,” Ceballos noted. (VOA)