Thursday January 17, 2019
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No more kidney transplants for foreigners in Sri Lanka

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Image source: youtube.com

Colombo: Sri Lanka on Thursday temporarily suspended kidney transplants for foreigners at government and private hospitals after a racket in India was linked to six local doctors.

Health Minister Rajitha Senaratne ordered a full investigation into claims by Indian police that the doctors attached to some private hospitals did kidney transplants for Indians involved in a major kidney racket, Xinhua news agency reported.

 

The Indian police have filed cases against six Sri Lankan doctors in relation to the racket on the charge of conducting paid kidney transplants in violation of ethics.

The Sri Lankan doctors have been accused of allegedly doing 60 kidney transplants.

Police in Nalgonda in Telangana in India arrested the kingpin in the kidney racket, Suresh Prajapathi, and two of his cronies, who facilitated the transplants.

The police also arrested Prajapathi’s accomplice Dilip Umedamal Chouhan. (IANS)

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Sri Lanka Forms Its Cabinet But Crisis Still Persists

Sirisena was health minister in Rajapaksa’s Cabinet when he defected and joined Wickremesinghe to challenge Rajapaksa in the 2015 presidential election.

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Ranil Wickremesinghe, ousted as prime minister in October, takes his oath for the same post before Sri Lanka's President Maithripala Sirisena during his swearing-in ceremony in Colombo, Sri Lanka, Dec. 16, 2018. VOA

Sri Lanka’s president Thursday appointed 28 lawmakers and Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe as Cabinet ministers after weeks of political crisis led to government dysfunction.

President Maithripala Sirisena administered oaths in a private event. Wickremesinghe’s reinstatement as prime minister earlier this week and the appointment of a new Cabinet will result in Sri Lanka’s government resuming functions that have been obstructed since October, but continued acrimony between Sirisena and Wickremesinghe means the crisis is far from over.

Notably, Sirisena has not appointed a law and order minister, a crucial post for investigating corruption and crime allegations against former strongman Mahinda Rajapaksa, his family and government members. Wickremesinghe promised such investigations before the 2015 elections.

 

Sri lanka, cabinet
Sri Lanka’s former President Mahinda Rajapaksa, front left, is sworn in as prime minister before President Maithripala Sirisena in Colombo, Sri Lanka. VOA

Sirisena sparked the crisis in October when he suddenly sacked Wickremesinghe and appointed former President Rajapaksa in his place.

 

Wickremesinghe insisted he was sacked illegally and hunkered down in the prime minister’s official residence in Colombo, while Rajapaksa failed to secure majority support in Parliament in two chaotic no-confidence votes.

Sirisena dissolved Parliament and called for elections. The Supreme Court first suspended the move and later declared the dissolution unconstitutional.

Separately, the Court of Appeal ordered Rajapaksa and his Cabinet to cease functioning. As a result, the newly restored government in Sri Lanka has only 11 days left to pass a budget to provision state money in 2019.

 

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Sri Lanka’s ousted Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe reacts during a news conference in Colombo, Sri Lanka, VOA

 

After reappointing Wickremesinghe, Sirisena made a speech saying he doubted that the new arrangement would last long. Sri Lankans are not scheduled to go to the national polls again until 2020, but if the government fails to function, Parliament can pass a resolution with a two-thirds vote for snap elections.

Also Read: Lawmakers in Sri Lanka Defect From President to Prime Minister

Sirisena was health minister in Rajapaksa’s Cabinet when he defected and joined Wickremesinghe to challenge Rajapaksa in the 2015 presidential election. After victory he formed a government with Wickremesinghe as prime minister, but the two disagreed on everything from economic reform to investigating alleged government abuses during Sri Lanka’s decades-long civil war. (VOA)