Monday May 28, 2018

No Need to Replace Fructose With Glucose in Foods

There is no benefit in replacing fructose - the sugar most commonly blamed for obesity - with glucose in commercially prepared foods, says research

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No Need to Replace Fructose With Glucose in Foods
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There is no benefit in replacing fructose – the sugar most commonly blamed for obesity – with glucose in commercially prepared foods, says research.

Researchers at St. Michael’s Hospital here have found that when portion sizes and calories are the same, fructose does not cause any more harm than glucose.

“Despite concerns about fructose’s link to obesity, there is no justification to replace fructose with glucose because there is no evidence of net harm,” said John Sievenpiper from St Michael’s Hospital.

The study found that consuming fructose may increase total cholesterol and postprandial triglycerides, a type of fat found in blood.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

However, fructose did not appear to affect insulin production, other fat levels in the blood stream or markers of fatty liver disease any more than glucose did.

In fact, fructose showed potential benefits over glucose in some key risk factor categories.

“Some healthcare analysts have thought fructose to be the cause of obesity because it’s metabolised differently than glucose,” said Sievenpiper.

In calorie-matched conditions, we found that fructose may actually be better at promoting healthy body weight, blood pressure and glycemic control than glucose, he added.

Fructose, a simple sugar found in honey, fruit, vegetables and other plants, is also the basis of high-fructose corn syrup – a sweetener often found in commercially prepared foods.

Also Read: Carb-Rich Diet May Affect Brain Health

The combination of both fructose and glucose produces sucrose, generally known as table sugar.

Sievenpiper said he feels that over consumption, rather than a type of sugar, is one of the leading causes of obesity.

The findings were published in the journal Current Opinion in Lipidology. (IANS)

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Poor dental health linked to diabetes risk

The differences in the average number of missing teeth among the three glucose tolerance groups were significant

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Poor dental health may lead to risk of diabetes. Pixabay
Poor dental health may lead to risk of diabetes. Pixabay
  • Poor dental health may lead to Diabetes
  • A dental examination may provide a way to identify the risk of diabetes
  • It is all connected to the glucose tolerance of a person

You may be at an increased risk of diabetes if you are not taking care of your dental health, warns a new study which suggests that dental examination may provide a way to identify the risk for developing the disease.

“We found a progressive positive relationship between worsening glucose tolerance and the number of missing teeth,” said lead author Raynald Samoa from the City of Hope National Medical Center in Duarte, California.

Teeth sensitivity may cause severe pain, therefore treating it as early as possible is a must
Poor dental health can increase the risk of diabetes. Wikimedia Commons

For the study, presented at the ENDO 2018: The Endocrine Society’s 100th Annual Meeting and Expo, researchers reviewed the records of 9,670 adults with 20 years of age and above who were examined by dentists during the 2009-2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

They analysed their reported body mass index (BMI) and glucose tolerance states by fasting plasma glucose, two-hour post-challenge plasma glucose, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), established diabetes and whether the condition was treated with oral agents or insulin.

Also Read: Night Shifts May Raise Risk Of Diabetes

The researchers recorded the numbers of missing teeth due to caries, or cavities, and periodontal disease for individual patients. They also determined the relationship between glucose tolerance and dental condition by considering age, gender, racial and ethnic group, family history of diabetes, smoking status, alcohol consumption, education and poverty index.

The researchers found a progressive increase in the number of patients with missing teeth as glucose tolerance declined, from 45.57 per cent in the group with normal glucose tolerance (NGT), to 67.61 per cent in the group with abnormal glucose tolerance (AGT), to 82.87 per cent in the group with diabetes mellitus (DM).

Type 1 Diabetes
The risk of diabetes is connected to dental health via glucose tolerance.

The differences in the average number of missing teeth among the three glucose tolerance groups were significant: 2.26 in the NGT group, 4.41 in the AGT group and 6.80 in those with DM, the researchers noted. IANS