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No Time for “Blame Game” in Fight against Climate Change

The scientists have spoken

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Time, Game, Fight
Copenhagen Mayor Frank Jensen, center, Children Investment Fund Foundation Chief Kate Hampton, left, and Seychelles President Danny Faure, right, addresses the Climate Action Summit in the United Nations General Assembly. VOA

The Seychelles president is warning there’s no time for a “blame game” in the fight against climate change and he urges major nations to do more.

President Danny Faure in an exclusive interview with The Associated Press says small island nations like his are the least responsible for the problem but among the most vulnerable as sea levels rise.

“The science is clear,” he said. “The scientists have spoken. We all know that we have a problem. What is needed is responsible global action.”

Earlier this year Faure gave a groundbreaking speech from a submersible hundreds of meters below the Indian Ocean surface to highlight the fragility of one of the world’s least explored ecosystems.

Time, Game, Fight
President Danny Faure in an exclusive interview with The Associated Press says small island nations like his are the least responsible for the problem but among the most vulnerable. Pixabay

He said the time to act on climate change is now.

Faure recently visited the British-led Nekton Mission, which earlier this year spent seven weeks surveying Seychelles waters. The island nation of fewer than 100,000 people is on track to protect almost a third of its waters by next year, a sea area larger than Germany.

But already rising water temperatures are bleaching the Seychelles’ coral reefs. The increased frequency of extreme weather events is another threat.

Even plastic waste poses a problem.

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The UNESCO World Heritage site of Aldabra, an important turtle nesting site, receives mounds of plastic waste brought on the waves.

“A total of 25,750 kilograms of marine debris was collected, out of which 50,000 single flip flops,” Faure said. “It just shows you the amount of pollution caused by marine debris to one of the pristine sites that we have.”
For the Nekton Mission, marine scientists from the University of Oxford surveyed underwater life, mapped large areas of the sea floor and ventured deep beneath the waves with manned submersibles and remote vehicles.

The scientists plan to present their research at a summit on the state of the Indian Ocean in 2022.

Time, Game, Fight
He said the time to act on climate change is now. Pixabay

Researcher Paris Stefanoudis said they are “pretty confident” they have discovered new species, from small zooplankton to soft corals, but the discoveries are yet to be scientifically verified.

“There was an incredible diversity and abundance of fish, especially in protected areas like Aldabra, which shows that marine protected areas do work when they are put in place,” Stefanoudis said.

Research assistant Nico Fassbender said it is clear the Seychelles’ policy of protecting its waters is working.

“It’s reflected in the fish,” he said. “Not just by the amount that we see, as in there’s more fish than on unprotected islands, but also because there’s bigger fish, which then tells us it’s a healthier ecosystem.”

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Faure said he is hopeful the scientists’ conclusions will give the international community more reason to protect marine areas.

“We as a country will be in a position scientifically to say, `This is how we measure and this is the difference,” he said. (VOA)

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More than 11,000 Scientists Declare ‘Climate Emergency’

The study, called the “World Scientists' Warning of a Climate Emergency,” was led by ecologists Bill Ripple and Christopher Wolf of Oregon State University

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Scientists, Climate, Emergency
FILE - An aerial view shows a Japan Self-Defense Force helicopter flying over residential areas flooded by the Chikuma river following Typhoon Hagibis in Nagano, central Japan, Oct. 13, 2019, in this photo taken by Kyodo. VOA

A global team of more than 11,000 scientists is warning that the planet “clearly and unequivocally faces a climate emergency.”

In a report published Tuesday in the journal Bioscience warns in no uncertain terms that the world would face “untold human suffering” if it does not make deep and lasting shifts in human activities that contribute to climate change.

The study, called the “World Scientists’ Warning of a Climate Emergency,” was led by ecologists Bill Ripple and Christopher Wolf of Oregon State University, and climate scientist William Moomaw of Tufts University, along with scientists from universities in South Africa and Australia. The signatories to the report represent several fields of study and come from 150 countries.

“Despite 40 years of global climate negotiations, with few exceptions, we have generally conducted business as usual and have largely failed to address this predicament,” the study says. “Climate change has arrived and is accelerating faster than many scientists expected.”

Scientists, Climate, Emergency
In a report published Tuesday in the journal Bioscience warns in no uncertain terms that the world would face “untold human suffering” if it does not make deep and lasting shifts. Pixabay

It is the first time a large group of scientists have collectively used the world “emergency” in reference to climate change.

The report identified six areas that need to be addressed immediately.

They include:

  • Cutting fossil fuel use by imposing carbon taxes and using energy more efficiently
  • Stabilizing global population growth by strengthening women’s rights and making family planning services “available to all people”
  • Cutting emissions of pollutants like soot and ethane
  • Moving to a more plant-based diet
  • Preventing the loss of biodiversity and the destruction of forests
  • Moving the global economic focus away from growth of wealth to sustainability and income equality

Also Read- Brazil’s Carbon Emissions Stable as Clean Energy Sources Use Offsets Deforestation

The scientists said it will most likely take strong actions by the public to move politicians toward adopting lasting policy changes.

“We believe that the prospects will be greatest if decision-makers and all of humanity promptly respond to this warning and declaration of a climate emergency, and act to sustain life on planet Earth, our only home,” the paper said. (VOA)