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Nokia Announces About Acquiring SpaceTime InSight

Nokia has made several small to medium-sized acquisitions as part of a strategy to build up a standalone software business to deliver higher profit margins than its classic communications hardware products.

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Nokia has made several small to medium-sized acquisitions as part of a strategy to build up a standalone software business to deliver higher profit margins than its classic communications hardware products.
Headquarter of Nokia, wikimdedia commons
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Nokia said on Monday it has acquired software maker SpaceTime Insight, which industrial customers use to manage millions of devices and assets across their networks, marking the equipment supplier’s latest push to expand beyond telecoms.

Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

SpaceTime supplies monitoring and analytics applications to customers in the energy, logistics, transportation and utilities sectors to run operations more cost effectively by reducing service outages and the need to send out repair trucks.

Among the more than two dozen major customers of SpaceTime, a decade-old Silicon Valley-based company, are FedEx, No. 2 U.S. rail operator Union Pacific, U.S. electric utilities Entergy and NextEra Energy and Singapore Power, Nokia said.

SpaceTime Insight and Rob Schilling, its chief executive, will join the Internet of Things (IoT) product unit within the Nokia Software business group. The company has raised around $50 million in private funding, according to Crunchbase data.

Nokia has made several small to medium-sized acquisitions as part of a strategy to build up a standalone software business to deliver higher profit margins than its classic communications hardware products.
Software Matrix, Pixabay

Nokia has made several small to medium-sized acquisitions as part of a strategy to build up a standalone software business to deliver higher profit margins than its classic communications hardware products.

“Traditionally, most networking companies built software to sell more networking equipment,” Nokia Software President Bhaskar Gorti said in a phone interview. “This is an expansion into the B2B side of the industry,” he said of sales beyond its core telecom markets to internet and industrial customers.

Only around 20 percent of its sales are tied to Nokia telecom equipment, Gorti said, with the remaining 80 percent sold on a standalone basis, both to network operators using rival equipment or, increasingly, to non-telecom customers.

Nokia Software generated just over 1.6 billion euros in revenue in 2017. Three months ago, Nokia renamed the group, previously known as Applications & Analytics, to reflect its growing importance alongside its mainstay network gear business.

Also Read: WhatsApp and Android Devices Crashed Due to a New Message Bug 

A year ago, it paid around $370 million to buy Comptel, beefing up its business aimed at telecom network operators.

Nokia ranked No. 2 among telecom software suppliers with a 10 percent share of the highly fragmented market, according to 2016 data from industry research group Analysys Mason.

Huawei held 11 percent, Ericsson 9 percent and Amdocs and Oracle, each held 8 percent. (IANS)

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NASA’s InSight Captures The Sound Of The Martian Wind

InSight landed on Mars on Nov. 26.

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InSight, Mars, NASA, Martian Wind
This Friday, Dec. 7, 2018 photo made available by NASA shows a view from the arm-mounted camera on the InSight Mars lander. The spacecraft arrived on the planet on Nov. 26. VOA

NASA’s new Mars lander has captured the first sounds of the “really unworldly” Martian wind.

The Jet Propulsion Laboratory released audio clips of the alien wind Friday. The low-frequency rumblings were collected by the InSight lander during its first week of operations at Mars.

The wind is estimated to be blowing 10 mph to 15 mph (16 kph to 24 kph). These are the first sounds from Mars that are detectable by human ears, according to the researchers.

“Reminds me of sitting outside on a windy summer afternoon … In some sense, this is what it would sound like if you were sitting on the InSight lander on Mars,” Cornell University’s Don Banfield told reporters.

NASA, Insight, Martian Wind
NASA’s InSight spacecraft, destined for the Elysium Planitia region in Mars’ northern hemisphere, undergoes launch preparations at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. VOA

Scientists involved in the project agree the martian wind has an otherworldly quality to it.

Thomas Pike of Imperial College London said the rumbling is “rather different to anything that we’ve experienced on Earth, and I think it just gives us another way of thinking about how far away we are getting these signals.”

The noise is of the wind blowing against InSight’s solar panels and the resulting vibration of the entire spacecraft. The sounds were recorded by an air pressure sensor inside the lander that’s part of a weather station, as well as the seismometer on the deck of the spacecraft.

The low frequencies are a result of Mars’ thin air density and even more so the seismometer itself — it’s meant to detect underground seismic waves, well below the threshold of human hearing. The seismometer will be moved to the Martian surface in the coming weeks; until then, the team plans to record more wind noise.

NASA, Insight, Martian Wind
This is an illustration showing a simulated view of NASA’s InSight lander about to land on the surface of Mars. This view shows the underside of the spacecraft. VOA

The 1976 Viking landers on Mars picked up spacecraft shaking caused by wind, but it would be a stretch to consider it sound, said InSight’s lead scientist, Bruce Banerdt, of JPL in Pasadena, California.

Also Read: NASA’s InSight Lands Safely On Mars

The “really unworldly” sounds from InSight, meanwhile, have Banerdt imaging he’s “on a planet that’s in some ways like the Earth, but in some ways really alien.”

InSight landed on Mars on Nov. 26.

“We’re all still on a high from the landing last week … and here we are less than two weeks after landing, and we’ve already got some amazing new science,” said NASA’s Lori Glaze, acting director of planetary science. “It’s cool, it’s fun.” (VOA)