Thursday January 18, 2018

Non-invasive brainwave technology can potentially cut post-traumatic stress

The technology works through resonance between brain frequencies and the acoustic stimulation, where the brain is supported to make self-adjustments towards improved balance and reduced hyperarousal. It requires no conscious or cognitive activity.

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Brainwaves can now potentially cure PTSD.
Brainwaves can now potentially cure PTSD.
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  • The new technology aims to reduce the effect of post traumatic stress in an individual.
  • It can reduce many post-traumatic symptoms, including insomnia, depressive mood and anxiety.

Researchers have developed a non-invasive brainwave mirroring technology that can significantly reduce symptoms of post-traumatic stress, especially in military personnel.

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a disorder characterised by failure to recover after experiencing or witnessing a terrifying event.

PTSD can cause Insomnia, Anxiety and many other mental problems.
PTSD can cause Insomnia, Anxiety and many other mental problems. Wikipediacommon

The symptoms include insomnia, poor concentration, sadness, re-experiencing traumatic events, irritability or hyper-alertness, as well as diminished autonomic cardiovascular regulation.

“Ongoing symptoms of post-traumatic stress, whether clinically diagnosed or not, are a pervasive problem in the military,” said lead investigator Charles H. Tegeler, professor, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Centre in North Carolina.

“Medications are often used to help control specific symptoms, but can produce side effects. Other treatments may not be well tolerated, and few show a benefit for the associated sleep disturbance. Additional non-invasive, non-drug therapies are needed,” Tegeler added.

In the study, published in the journal Military Medical Research, the team used a high-resolution, relational, resonance-based, electroencephalic mirroring (HIRREM) — a non-invasive method, in which computer software algorithms translate specific brain frequencies into audible tones in real time.

This provides a chance for the brain to listen to itself through an acoustic mirror, Tegeler said.

The results showed reductions in post-traumatic symptoms, including insomnia, depressive mood and anxiety after six months of using the brainwave technology.

The technology works through resonance between brain frequencies and the acoustic stimulation, where the brain is supported to make self-adjustments towards improved balance and reduced hyperarousal. It requires no conscious or cognitive activity.

The net effect is to support the brain to reset stress response patterns that have been rewired by repetitive traumatic events, physical or non-physical, the researchers said. IANS

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Meet the man behind Facebook’s successful ad business

Mehta says that Facebook is now increasingly spending time in incorporating more machine learning into solutions and driving efficiency through technology.

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This change was supposed to make Facebook more meaningful. Pixabay
This change was supposed to make Facebook more meaningful. Pixabay
  • Vastal Mehta is the brain behind Facebook’s successful advertising campaigns.
  • According to him, Facebook is increasingly improving its machinery for better efficiency.
  • The company is going to ensure that no distributor use its tools in a wrong way.

Facebook owes Indian-origin engineer, Vastal Mehta, a lot for its success in generating billions of dollars in ad revenues every year as he steers the team that works with advertisers to build the technology and infrastructure needed to run more effective campaigns on the platform.

When he started out on this in 2010, Mehta was the lone engineer in the team and now, he serves as Facebook’s Director of Solutions Engineering and leads a team of more than 100 people which is responsible for Facebook’s huge ad revenues.

According to emarketer.com, Facebook earned a whopping $17.37 billion in digital ad revenue in the US in the third quarter of 2017 and is expected to reach $21.57 billion in 2018 and $25.56 billion in 2019.

Mehta said that when he first started working on this seven years ago, it was a very different landscape, both for mobile and for Facebook — which had not introduced advertising into the News Feed at that time.

According to Tech Crunch, at this time the company was trying to shift in a big way towards mobile and advertisers were finding it difficult to adapt to the change.

“For example, travel companies didn’t have teams set up to reach consumers with mobile advertising. We knew that we needed to invest in helping businesses build infrastructure to power their mobile advertising, so I started a team that could help businesses in this sort of bespoke way,” Mehta was quoted as saying.

Mehta realised this and is now working to offer its biggest advertisers some degree of technical support by building the products.

Mehta said, dynamic ads were first inspired by the complaints of an advertiser he was meeting with in Hamburg, Germany and he then worked with the Facebook Ads team to create a prototype eventually leading to a more polished product and broader availability.

Facebook said that, on average, clients working with the solutions engineering team see their return on ad spend improve by 100 per cent.

Mehta says that Facebook is now increasingly spending time in incorporating more machine learning into solutions and driving efficiency through technology.

Facebook is working to improve its technology and efficiency to give a better experience to its users. Pixabay
Facebook is working to improve its technology and efficiency to give a better experience to its users. Pixabay

“This includes building better optimisation tools that help the client without them needing to adjust and turn nobs in the interface. We see this as a huge area of investment across our business over the next year,” he was quoted as saying.

Earlier this month, Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg said that the social media giant would take a closer look at its advertising policies to ensure that advertisers do not use Facebook tools in a discriminatory way. IANS