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North Korean Hackers Behind Surge in Cyberattacks on Banks: Report

However, if North Korea is to be believed the hacker is nothing more than a figment of the US law enforcement's imagination

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With the US-led sanctions damaging its economy, the North Korean government is using cyberattacks on banks to raise cash, according to US officials, the CNN reported.

A summit between US President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un ended on Thursday with no agreement after Washington refused Pyongyang’s demands for economic sanctions relief.

It is believed that the North Koreans are turning to cybercrime to steal money due to the increasing effectiveness of sanctions.

In just a few years, the North Korean intelligence services have grown capable of stealing large sums through sophisticated methods, Anthony Ferrante, a former Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and White House cybersecurity official, was quoted as saying on Friday.

Unlike hackers from other countries like Russia, Iran or China who focus more on gathering intelligence, the North Korean hackers focus on acquiring cash, added John Demers, Assistant Attorney General for National Security at the US Department of Justice.

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A man holds a laptop computer as cyber code is projected on him in this illustration picture. VOA

“The North Koreans have quickly become the world’s most advanced and persistent digital bank robbers,” said Ferrante, now Head of Cybersecurity at FTI Consulting, a business advisory firm.

In 2018, the US Justice Department charged a North Korean computer programmer in several cases of cybercrimes over the last four years, including the $81 million Bangladesh Bank heist in 2016, the Sony Pictures hack in 2014 and WannaCry ransomware attack in 2017 that infected thousands of computers in hospitals, universities and banks in several countries around the world.

The Department of Justice said that a person named Jin Hyok Park was responsible for the attacks and Park was believed to be a member of North Korea’s military intelligence outfit the Reconnaissance General Bureau as well as a suspected member of Lazarus, a hacking group which has been linked to a string of attacks against everything from banks to government agencies across the world.

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However, if North Korea is to be believed the hacker is nothing more than a figment of the US law enforcement’s imagination.

According to a 2018 report from cybersecurity vendor Group-IB, Lazarus was behind 14 hacking attacks on cryptocurrency exchanges since January 2017 — stealing $571 million. (IANS)

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Iranian Hackers Wage Offensive Cyberattacks Amid Tensions with US

Iran has increased its offensive cyberattacks against the U.S. government and critical infrastructure

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Iranian, Hackers, Cyberattacks
FILE - Iranian President Hassan Rouhani addresses the nation from Tehran, Aug. 6, 2018. Iran has increased its offensive cyberattacks against the U.S. government and critical infrastructure as tensions have grown between the two nations, experts say. VOA

Iran has increased its offensive cyberattacks against the U.S. government and critical infrastructure as tensions have grown between the two nations, cybersecurity firms say.

In recent weeks, hackers believed to be working for the Iranian government have targeted U.S. government agencies, as well as sectors of the economy, including oil and gas, sending waves of spear-phishing emails, according to representatives of cybersecurity companies CrowdStrike and FireEye, which regularly track such activity.

It was not known if any of the hackers managed to gain access to the targeted networks with the emails, which typically mimic legitimate emails but contain malicious software.

U.S. sanctions

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FILE – Security firm FireEye’s logo is seen outside the company’s offices in Milpitas, Calif. VOA

The cyber offensive is the latest chapter in U.S.-Iran cyber operations battle, with this recent sharp increase in attacks occurring after the Trump administration imposed sanctions on the Iranian petrochemical sector this month.

Tensions have escalated since the U.S. withdrew from the 2015 nuclear deal with Iran last year and began a policy of “maximum pressure.” Iran has since been hit by multiple rounds of sanctions. Tensions spiked this past week after Iran shot down an unmanned U.S. drone,  an incident that nearly led to a U.S. military strike against Iran on Thursday evening.

“Both sides are desperate to know what the other side is thinking,” said John Hultquist, director of intelligence analysis at FireEye. “You can absolutely expect the regime to be leveraging every tool they have available to reduce the uncertainty about what’s going to happen next, about what the U.S.’s next move will be.”

CrowdStrike shared images of the spear-phishing emails with AP.

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One such email that was confirmed by FireEye appeared to come from the Executive Office of the President and seemed to be trying to recruit people for an economic adviser position. Another email was more generic and appeared to include details on updating Microsoft Outlook’s global address book.

The Iranian actor involved in the cyberattack, dubbed “Refined Kitten” by CrowdStrike, has for years targeted the U.S. energy and defense sectors, as well as allies such as Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, said Adam Meyers, vice president of intelligence at CrowdStrike.

The National Security Agency would not discuss Iranian cyber actions specifically but said in a statement to AP on Friday that “there have been serious issues with malicious Iranian cyber actions in the past.”

“In these times of heightened tensions, it is appropriate for everyone to be alert to signs of Iranian aggression in cyberspace and ensure appropriate defenses are in place,” the NSA said.

Iranian, Hackers, Cyberattacks
FILE – In 2010, the Stuxnet virus disrupted operation of centrifuges at a uranium enrichment facility in Iran. VOA

Fuel sectors, infrastructure

Iran has long targeted the U.S. oil and gas sectors and other critical infrastructure, but those efforts dropped significantly after the nuclear agreement was signed. Cyber experts said that after President Donald Trump withdrew the U.S. from the deal in May 2018, they saw an increase in Iranian hacking efforts.

“This is not a remote war [anymore],” said Sergio Caltagirone, vice president of threat intelligence at Dragos Inc. “This is one where Iranians could ‘bring the war home’ to the United States.”

Caltagirone said as nations increase their abilities to engage offensively in cyberspace, the ability of the United States to pick a fight internationally and have that fight stay out of the United States physically is increasingly reduced.

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The U.S. has had a contentious cyber history with Iran.

In 2010, the so-called Stuxnet virus disrupted the operation of thousands of centrifuges at a uranium enrichment facility in Iran. Iran accused the U.S. and Israel of trying to undermine its nuclear program through covert operations.

Iran has also shown a willingness to conduct destructive campaigns. Iranian hackers in 2012 launched an attack against state-owned oil company Saudi Aramco, releasing a virus that erased data on 30,000 computers and left an image of a burning American flag on screens.

Banks, dam

In 2016, the U.S. indicted Iranian hackers for a series of punishing cyberattacks on U.S. banks and a small dam outside New York City.

U.S. Cyber Command refused to comment on the latest Iranian activity. “As a matter of policy and for operational security, we do not discuss cyberspace operations, intelligence or planning,” Pentagon spokeswoman Heather Babb said in a statement. The White House did not respond to a request for comment.

Despite the apparent cyber campaign, experts say the Iranians would not necessarily immediately exploit any access they gain into computer systems and may seek to maintain future capabilities should their relationship with the U.S. further deteriorate.

“It’s important to remember that cyber is not some magic offensive nuke you can fly over and drop one day,” said Oren Falkowitz, a former National Security Agency analyst. It takes years of planning, he said, but as tensions increase, “cyber impact is going to be one of the tools they use and one of the hardest things to defend against.” (VOA)