Tuesday January 21, 2020
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Norway Blames Russia for Jamming GPS Signals Again

"Jamming is also a threat to, among others, civilian air traffic and police and health operations in peacetime."

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Norway, Russia
A lone car has it's choice of entry ramps onto highway E-18, usually one of the busiest roads leading into the Norwegian capital, because the onset of vacation time slows Oslo to a relaxed crawl, as seen July 16, 2004. VOA

Norway’s foreign intelligence unit on Monday expressed renewed concerns that its GPS signals in the country’s Far North were being jammed, as Oslo again blamed Russia for the “unacceptable” acts.

In its annual national risk assessment report, the intelligence service said that in repeated incidents since 2017, GPS signals have been blocked from Russian territory in Norwegian regions near the border with Russia.

The jamming events have often coincided with military exercises on Norwegian soil, such as the NATO Trident Juncture maneuvers last autumn and the mid-January deployment of British attack helicopters in Norway for training in Arctic conditions.

Norway, GPS

Norway’s foreign intelligence unit on Monday expressed renewed concerns that its GPS signals in the country’s Far North were being jammed. Pixabay

“This is not only a new challenge for Norwegian and Allied training operations,” the head of the intelligence unit, Morten Haga Lunde, said as he presented the report.

“Jamming is also a threat to, among others, civilian air traffic and police and health operations in peacetime.”

Norway has on several occasions raised the issue with Russian authorities, and is cooperating with other Nordic countries to gather as much information as possible, Defence Minister Frank Bakke-Jensen said.

Norway, GPS
Norway has on several occasions raised the issue with Russian authorities. Pixabay

“It’s important… to say clearly that this is unacceptable,” he told television channel TV2 Nyhetskanalen.

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In November, neighbouring Finland summoned Russia’s ambassador to Helsinki to answer to accusations that Moscow had disrupted geopositioning signals on its territory during the Trident Juncture exercises.

Moscow has rejected the allegations as baseless. (VOA)

Next Story

Sales of E-Cars in Norway Hit a New Record: Experts

E-Car Sales in Norway Reach Record High

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New models of e-cars arriving on the market should help push their share higher still this year. Pixabay

Sales of new electric cars in Norway hit a record high last year, sector experts said Friday, reaching 42.4 percent of all nearly-registered cars in 2019, mostly thanks to strong demand for Tesla’s Model 3.

Norway, a major oil producer that has pioneered electric mobility, offers a very advantageous tax regime for clean vehicles, making them highly competitive in cost terms against petrol and diesel vehicles.

New e-car models arriving on the market should help push their share higher still this year, said OFV, a body which monitors Norway’s car market.

In 2019, 60,316 all-electric new cars were sold in Norway out of a total of 142,381, a rise of 30.8 percent from the previous year when the market share of e-cars was 31.2 percent.

The Norwegian car importer association said it expects e-cars to take a market share for new cars of 55 to 60 percent in 2020.

New models including the Volkswagen ID.3, the Ford Mustang Mach-e, the Polestar 2 and the Peugeot e-208 are expected to boost e-car sales.

NORWAY E-cars
E-cars are being charged on a street in the Norwegian capital Oslo. VOA

“Today, in 2020 and in the years to come, a much larger range of cars is coming, with increased autonomy, greater size and in affordable price segments,” said OFV boss Oyvind Solberg Thorsen.

U.S. firm Tesla was the biggest single seller of e-cars in Norway last year, with its latest Model 3 alone selling 15,700 units.

Bigger goals

Norway’s Electric Vehicle Association called the numbers “very positive” but told AFP it had hoped for e-cars to account for 50 percent of new car sales last year.

The association’s secretary-general, Christina Bu, called on the government to maintain tax breaks for electric cars, which have become the topic of much debate in the Scandinavian country.

Norway, where electricity is almost exclusively generated by hydropower, has a 2025 target for all new cars to be zero-emission models.

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Hybrid cars, which run on both thermal and electric energy, accounted for 25.9 percent of the new car market in Norway last year, while petrol and diesel cars accounted for around 16 percent each. (VOA)