Sunday October 21, 2018

Now a reality show for folk singers on national television

0
//
661
credit: www.dreamstime.com
Republish
Reprint

By NewsGram Staff-Writer

The lovers of folk music are having a happy-time as for the first time on Indian national television an exclusive reality show is being aired for promoting the talent of folk singers from all across the nation. The show ‘Maati Ke Laal’ has been started with the aim of providing exposure to budding regional talents. The show kicked off on government’s DD Kisan channel from 22nd August.

This idea was brained and conceptualized by senior journalist and writer Pankaj Shukl who thinks that a show like this is the need of the hour as it would help the local artists in gaining fame of international level.

Pankaj Shukl with Annu Kapoor at the set of Maati Ke Laal
Pankaj Shukl with Annu Kapoor at the set of Maati Ke Laal

It is a fresh concept and that is why gaining the public interest. The auditions for the show were conducted across 16 states. The selected participants will go through four rounds before entering the grand finale. ‘Maati Ke Laal’ will feature singers competing with each other for the prestigious title of ‘the biggest folk star’.

Veteran actor Annu Kapoor and folk singer Ila Arun will judge this show which will promote tunes that are generally sung during rituals like marriages etc. Also, the indigenous title of the show takes the audiences back to the roots of rural India and that is why the show is so far well received.

Shukl added, “The program will help folk music in rejuvenating itself and establishing a new identity in the mind of the viewers. It provides a platform to every amateur singer around the remote localities for exhibiting their talent.”

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2015 NewsGram

Next Story

YouTube Becomes The Most Used Application For Music: Report

This report also shows the challenges the music community continues to face.

0
YouTube, Google
The YouTube Music app is displayed on a mobile phone in Los Angeles. VOA

If you are listening to music, chances are you’re on YouTube.

A music consumer report by the industry’s global body IFPI published Tuesday found that 86 percent of us listen to music through on-demand streaming.

And nearly half that time, 47 percent is spent on YouTube.

Video as a whole accounted for 52 percent of the time we spent streaming music, posing challenges to such subscription services as Spotify and SoundCloud.

YouTube
The content-sharing platform is also adding a tool, thus, allowing creators to add or remove non-skippable advertisements in bulk. Pixabay

But while Spotify’s estimated annual revenue per user was $20 (17.5 euros), YouTube’s was less than a dollar.

The London-based IFPI issued a broader overview in April that found digital sales for the first time making up the majority of global revenues thanks to streaming.

The report published Tuesday looked into where and when we listen to music.

It found that three in four people globally use smartphones, with the rate among 16- to 24-year-olds reaching 94 percent.

The highest levels were recorded in India, where 96 percent of consumers used smartphones for music, including 99 percent of young adults.

YouTube
YouTube music will separate the movies and music section on the platform. Pixabay

But music does not end when we put away our phones, with 86 percent globally also listening to the radio.

Copyright infringement was still a big issue, with unlicensed music accounting for 38 percent of what was consumed around the world.

“This report also shows the challenges the music community continues to face — both in the form of the evolving threat of digital copyright infringement as well as in the failure to achieve fair compensation from some user-upload services,” said IFPI chief Frances Moore.

The report noted that “96% of consumers in China and 96% in India listen to licensed music.”

Also Read: Google Maps Gets A New Update That Lets You Access Music

It did not, however, say how many of those consumers also listened to music that infringed copyrights.

Overall, the average consumer spent 2.5 hours a day listening to music, with the largest share of it consumed while driving, the industry report said. (VOA)