Wednesday October 24, 2018

Now, a Chocolate Bar to Cut Wrinkles

Dark chocolate has already been linked with certain health benefits, such as helping to lower blood pressure and reducing the risk of strokes thanks to its high content of antioxidants

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Chocolate
Can a chocolate bar really banish wrinkles? Read this article to find out. Pixabay
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The world’s largest chocolate maker has unveiled a new chocolate that slows ageing process and keeps wrinkles at bay.

Chocolate makers Barry Callebaut have come up with Acticoa, which is packed with natural antioxidants and can protect skin from damage by harmful free radicals. The health-boosting chocolate bars are invented by chocolatiers at Barry Callebaut.

The company developed the time-defying snacks by finding a way to preserve antioxidants called flavonols, which are found in cocoa beans but are usually destroyed in the chocolate-making process.

Flavonols “mop up” free radicals caused by smoking, pollution, caffeine and lack of sleep, which can accelerate the ageing process.

Chocolate
The world’s largest chocolate maker has unveiled a new chocolate that slows ageing process and keeps wrinkles at bay. Pixabay

Acticoa is available in the form of a number of popular existing chocolate brands, such as “Thortons” “Antioxi Dark Berryboost” and “Guylian Extra Seashells”.

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“Chocolate and health do not seem to fit together but it is a very interesting proposition: if I can eat something I like and it is good for me, that is great. Chocolate is probably at the bottom of the list when you think about making food healthier,” the telegraph.co.uk quoted Harry Vriens, of Barry Callebaut, as saying.

Dark chocolate has already been linked with certain health benefits, such as helping to lower blood pressure and reducing the risk of strokes thanks to its high content of antioxidants. (Bollywood Country)

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Wrinkles on Forehead May Predict Death Risk Due to Cardiovascular Disease

The results were presented at the ESC Congress 2018, the annual conference of the European Society of Cardiology in Munich

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Wrinkles
Your forehead wrinkles may predict cardiovascular death risk. Pixabay

The wrinkles on your forehead may not be just an inevitable consequence of ageing, but could also signal an early death due to cardiovascular disease (CVD), researchers have warned.

The findings showed that increased deep forehead wrinkles, more than what is typical for their age, could be linked to death atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries due to plaque build-up — a major contributor to heart attacks and other CVD events.

“Forehead wrinkles may be a marker of atherosclerosis. The higher your wrinkle score, the more your cardiovascular mortality risk increases,” said Yolande Esquirol, associate professor at the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse, France.

While the furrows in the brow are not a better method of evaluating heart risk than existing methods, such as blood pressure and lipid profiles, yet they can raise a red flag earlier, at a simple glance, the researchers said.

Changes in collagen protein and oxidative stress seem to play a part both in atherosclerosis and wrinkles. Also, blood vessels in the forehead are so small they may be more sensitive to plaque build-up meaning wrinkles could one of the early signs of vessel ageing, they explained.

Wrinkles
A score of zero meant no wrinkles while a score of three meant “numerous deep wrinkles”. Pixabay

For the new study, the team investigated a different visible marker of age — horizontal forehead wrinkles — to see if they had any value in assessing cardiovascular risk in a group of 3,200 working adults.

A score of zero meant no wrinkles while a score of three meant “numerous deep wrinkles”.

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Those who had wrinkle scores of two and three had almost 10 times the risk of dying compared with people who had wrinkle scores of zero, after adjustments for age, gender, education, smoking status, blood pressure, heart rate, diabetes and lipid levels.

The results were presented at the ESC Congress 2018, the annual conference of the European Society of Cardiology in Munich. (IANS)

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