Monday February 19, 2018

NSW young woman of the year (Australia), secured by Indian doctor

She claimed an NSW in Australia. winning prestigious awards abroad helps in the strengthening of our country.

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certificate to Dharmica Mistry by NSW

Indian-origin Dr. Dharmica Mistry has been awarded the “NSW Young Woman of the Year ” award for being an exceptional researcher involved in implementing life changing medical research around early breast cancer detection that will impact millions of women around the world.

She was nominated by the Minister of Health, Jillian Skinner, and the ceremony was held last month in Parliament House.

NSW Health Woman of the Year 2016 citation stated that “Recipient of the 2015 Young Scientist Award, Dharmica is an inspiration to young women considering a future in medical research and microbiology. Dharmica is an exceptional researcher who is involved in implementing life changing medical research around early breast cancer detection that will impact upon women around the world.

Dharmica Mistry commercializing a cheap blood test for screening of blood cancer
Dharmica Mistry commercializing a cheap blood test for screening of blood cancer

“The core focus for Dharmica’s work is to commercialize a universal ground-breaking breast cancer screening test in collaboration with the University of Kentucky.

“Without her persistence, unfailing optimism and drive over the past eight years, a transformational global test may have never been developed. The partnerships and research driven by Dharmica have proven 90 per cent accurate in detecting the presence of the most common form of invasive cancer. Dharmica’s dream of significantly transforming women’s health worldwide through medical innovation is fast becoming a reality,” the citation said, according to The Indian Telegraph.

Mistry is the Chief Scientist at BCAL Diagnostics, a small Australian biotechnology company developing a revolutionary blood test for the detection of breast cancer.?

She holds a BSc (Hons) from Sydney University, majoring in Microbiology. She was awarded a PhD from Macquarie University for her work on the detection and characterisation of novel biomarkers in blood and hair that could be used as the basis for a blood test for breast cancer.

Her insight into the potential of fatty acids in the blood stream, to indicate the presence of breast cancer, led to the filing of an international patent and was the basis for the formation of BCAL Diagnostics in 2010.

Despite an initial lack of resources, Mistry has doggedly pursued her vision to develop BCAL’s technology as an?accurate, early test for the presence of breast cancer, for women of all ages, worldwide.

Her determination has resulted in her leading an international collaboration with researchers in Kentucky, San Francisco and Dublin, as well as in New South Wales, with the aim of bringing the technology from a research finding to the wider community.

In November 2015, she was?awarded the “Young Scientist Award” at?the World Congress on Controversies in Breast Cancer, in Melbourne, for her outstanding presentation and innovative approach to breast cancer detection.

In December?2015,?she graduated with a distinction from the?NSW Health Medical Devices Commercialization Training Program, and was awarded?an international travel scholarship for her outstanding work in the medical device field.

SOURCEtheindiandiaspora
  • Annesha Das Gupta

    More than strengthening the international relations between the two countries, I think it is more important to focus on her achievements and resilient countenance. Recognisation of her merits can be potential boon for all the womenfolk in India. Encouraging them to pursue their dream careers with much more resolution.

  • Annesha Das Gupta

    More than strengthening the international relations between the two countries, I think it is more important to focus on her achievements and resilient countenance. Recognisation of her merits can be potential boon for all the womenfolk in India. Encouraging them to pursue their dream careers with much more resolution.

Next Story

Facts About India’s First Female Doctor: Rukhmabai Raut

Rukhmabai worked to a great extent for the upliftment and betterment of women. She even published a pamphlet and called it “Purdah-the need for its abolition.”

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Rukhmabai was born on November 22, 1864, in a Marathi family to Janardhan Pandurang and Jayantibai. Wikimedia Commons
Rukhmabai was born on November 22, 1864, in a Marathi family to Janardhan Pandurang and Jayantibai. Wikimedia Commons
  • Rukhmabai was involved in a landmark legal case involving her marriage as a child bride between 1884 and 1888
  • Rukhmabai was born on November 22, 1864
  • Rukhmabai was married at the age of 11 to a 19-year-old boy Dadaji Bhikaji

Rukhmabai Raut was one of the bold and progressive women of that time. The other notable first Indian females to practice medicine are Anandibai Joshi, Kadambini Ganguly and Chandramukhi Basu.

Rukhmabai was the first Indian physician who is best known for being one of the first Indian women doctors in colonial India as well as being involved in a landmark legal case involving her marriage as a child bride between 1884 and 1888. It was a real big deal back then in India at that time.

Also Read: Rene Laennec: The Man Who Invented Stethoscope

 

Rukhmabai was the first Indian physician. Wikimedia Commons
Rukhmabai was the first Indian physician. Wikimedia Commons

The case raised quite a significant public debate across Indian society, which mostly included law vs tradition, social reform vs conservatism and feminism in both British-ruled India and England. The uproar ultimately contributed to the Age of Consent Act in 1891.

Rukhmabai was born on November 22, 1864, in a Marathi family to Janardhan Pandurang and Jayantibai. Her mother suffered because of the custom of child marriage. Rukhmabai was known for her staunch stand against divorce and her love for higher studies in medicine.

Before becoming one of the pioneers of women emancipation, Rukhmabaihad a life full of struggle

Top 5 Unknown Facts about Rukhmabai Raut?

  1. Rukhmabai was married at the age of 11 to a 19-year-old boy Dadaji Bhikaji. She was just 8 years old when her father. Rukhmabai chose to complete her education. It is said that the couple never lived together

2. Rukhmabai’s Mother Jayantibai transferred all her property to her. Later, Jayantibai remarried and Rukhmabai step-father supported her at every step.

3. Rukhmabai refused to live with her husband and maternal-in-laws because they were after her property that she inherited from his deceased father. She even fought a long legal case against her husband and in the end, Dadaji Bhikaji won the case. The judgment was criticised by Bal Gangadhar Tilak and other prominent Hindu leaders. The court criticized her stance on marriage and her aversion to reuniting with her husband.

4. In 1884, Rukhmabai’s husband filed a petition in the Bombay High Court and pleaded to restore conjugal rights of the husband over his wife. The court in its judgement told Rukhmabai to comply or to go to prison. Rukhmabai refused the judgment and stated that she would suffer imprisonment rather than entering into a marriage she did not want.

5. The case again came to court in 1887. This time, Rukhmabai wrote numerous pieces of letters under a pseudo name,“A Hindu Lady”, stating the condition of women, who became victims of child marriage. Her articles got her the support and public sentiments in her favour.

Also Read: Acharya Charaka: Indian father Of Medicine, Author of Charaka Samhita “science of Ayurveda”

6. Rukhmabai did not take the lying down and pleaded Queen Victoria. But still, she had to shell out  Rs 2000 to her husband as a settlement.

Google India paid a rich tribute to Dr Rukhmabai Raut by dedicating its doodle depicting a lady with a stethoscope around her neck. Wikimedkia Commons
Google India paid a rich tribute to Dr Rukhmabai Raut by dedicating its doodle depicting a lady with a stethoscope around her neck. Wikimedkia Commons

7. A public fund was raised to support her travel and study in England at the London School of Medicine for the 5 years degree course.

8. After her successful completion of medicine course, Rukhmabai returned to India as a qualified physician in 1894 and joined a hospital in Surat as the First practising female doctor in India. There she served as the chief medical officer for 35 long years and retired around 1930. She breathed her last in 1955, at the age of 91.

9. Rukhmabai worked to a great extent for the upliftment and betterment of women. She even published a pamphlet and called it “Purdah-the need for its abolition.”

10. Last year, even Google India paid a rich tribute to Dr Rukhmabai Raut by dedicating its doodle depicting a lady with a stethoscope around her neck, surrounded by women patients and nurses in a hospital.