Monday February 26, 2018
Home India Nuke deal wit...

Nuke deal with US turns out to be a reverie for Pakistan

0
//
128
www.pakistantoday.com.pk
Republish
Reprint

By Arka Mondal

New Delhi:There are obvious reasons behind the US shying away from inking the epic nuke deal with Pakistan. USA very well knows that in Pakistan the biggest debacle is not any militia like Al Qaeda or Taliban but the country’s army itself. Democracy is a rare word in the Pakistani history as on numerous occasions coups triggered by the Army chief toppled the elected government and usurped control over the militancy-ravaged nation. The Pakistan army that nurtures an innate virtue of unremitting hostility against India has ceaselessly tailed its nefarious motives over the country’s interest.

It is common in Pakistan that the army has stymied the elected government from developing a healthy relation with India. When Nawaz Sharif tried to mend ties with his Indian counterpart Narendra Modi via his ‘mango diplomacy’, the Army came into the fray and literally arm-twisted Sharif and refrained him from doing a patch up.  USA does understand that Pakistan presenting dossiers on India’s alleged involvement in trying to destabilize the country is nothing but a disgruntled move to garner support. The international community is well aware of the fact that for the last forty years the army has actively backed terrorist outfits in Afghanistan which has led to death of American soldiers posted in the country. The fact that Taliban spearhead Mullah Omar and Al Qaeda supremo Osama bin Laden were traced in Pakistani soil had also irked US diplomats.

Back in 2014, a soft-coup engineered by the army forced Premier Nawaz Sharif to change his stance and chalk out a new foreign policy according to the directives of the armed forces. Sharif had no other options of clinging on to power but to surrender before the whims and fancies of the military and the Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI).

Moreover, Pakistan failed miserably to justify its nuclear expansion strategy.  For long the country has been giving lame excuses of bolstering its nuclear arsenal to nullify India’s nuke program and military prowess.  Strangely, while India produces five nuclear warheads in a year, Pakistan stockpiles around 20. The American reluctance in the nuke deal can also be attributed to the fact that USA has become apprehensive of the statistics on nukes being mysteriously lost or accidentally used from Pakistan’s arsenal.

If USA okayed the nuke deal, it knew India would also beef up its nuclear prowess to thwart the challenge. This would arguably lead to a cold warlike situation in the Indian subcontinent with China, a higher nuke equipped nation, taking a stand. Moreover, USA’s military campaign in Afghanistan has drawn flak among several global quarters and Washington can ill afford to make a wrong move at this juncture.

Pakistan did try to present Kashmir as a rationale behind expanding its nuclear arsenal. But Islamabad is reluctant to accept the reality that during the partition it was the ruler of Kashmir who preferred India over Pakistan. Moreover, India has stationed over 50000 soldiers in Kashmir to neutralize any Pakistani attack.

As Pakistan continues to bicker with the Kashmir issue, it frequently ignores that each and every day the country is being torn in tatters with bomb blasts and subversive activities. Instead of grumbling and asking for favours from a superpower, it is high time for Pakistan to understand that it has to revamp its policy to deal with India who is firm on its stand that there is no possibility of a dialogue unless Pakistan ratifies the treaties.

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2015 NewsGram

Next Story

Pakistan’s Court Summons TV Team for ‘Disrespecting’ Valentine’s Day Ban

On February 14, Geo TV’s popular Report Card show dedicated a 15-minute segment to discussing the justification of the court’s ban on Valentine’s Day coverage and celebrations

0
//
8
People buy flowers to celebrate Valentine's Day in Islamabad, Pakistan, Feb. 14, 2018. Pakistan's media regulatory authority, acting on a court order, has instructed all news channels, radio stations and print media to refrain from promoting Valentine's Day. VOA

A Pakistani court has summoned several TV reporters from the country’s largest private TV station over accusations of “ridiculing” last year’s ruling that barred Valentine’s Day celebrations and its media coverage across the country.

On February 14, Geo TV’s popular Report Card show dedicated a 15-minute segment to discussing the justification of the court’s ban on Valentine’s Day coverage and celebrations.

Two of the panelists in the show questioned the rationale for the ban.

Hasan Nisar, a prominent Lahore-based political analyst, declared the restrictions “illogical” and “ridiculous” for society.

“I do not even have anything to say on it, it’s funny,” Nisar said.

Echoing Nisar, Imtiaz Alam, a leading reporter and panelist of the show, said the restrictions were “useless.”

“How can the court interfere as it is against the fundamental rights of the people? Do we have Taliban regime in Pakistan?” Alam asked.

“This is a cultural martial law and curfew to enforce the extreme ideologies. This is a sick mindset, and the moral policing through PEMRA [Pakistan Electronic Media Authority] is shameless,” Alam said.

ALSO READ: 20 best valentine’s day gift ideas for him & her

Valentine's Day
People buy flowers to celebrate Valentine’s Day in Islamabad, Pakistan, Feb. 14, 2018. Pakistan’s media regulatory authority, acting on a court order, has instructed all news channels, radio stations and print media to refrain from promoting Valentine’s Day. VOA

Court order

Last year, on February 13, Islamabad’s High Court declared Valentine’s Day celebration un-Islamic and imposed a ban on any public or official celebrations.

The government reinstated the ban for a second consecutive year earlier this month to comply with the court’s ruling.

PEMRA also issued a fresh directive to remind its TV and radio licensees to refrain from promoting the day on their stations.

“Respondents are directed to ensure that nothing about the celebrations of Valentine’s Day and its promotion is spread on the electronic and print media,” PEMRA’s notification reads.

On charges of failing to adhere to the court’s order and PEMRA’s instruction, Islamabad court summoned the Geo TV host, two guests and the chief executive officer of the station to appear before the court next week and defend themselves in a contempt-of-court case.

“This act of the host and the participants apparently is tainted with malafide, ulterior motives, aims to undermine the authority of the court and to disrespect the order passed by the court, which clearly comes within the definition of the contempt of court,” the court said, according to local media.

The ban on Valentine’s Day celebrations and sensitivity toward it are not new in Pakistan. Some political and religious groups, such as Jamaat-i-Islami, have carried out rallies and protests against the celebration of the day, declaring it “unethical and un-Islamic.”

There have been instances in the past where local authorities prohibited the February 14 festivities in different cities across the nation.

In 2016, President Mamnoon Hussain also warned Pakistanis to stay away from celebrating Valentine’s Day, declaring it was “not a part of Muslim tradition, but of the West.”

ALSO READ: If You Are Going Single Into This Valentine’s Day Then These Tweets Will Lift Your Spirit

Valentine's Day
A couple buys flowers to celebrate Valentine’s Day, in Islamabad, Pakistan, Feb. 13, 2017. A Pakistani judge has banned Valentine’s Day celebrations in the country’s capital, saying they are against Islamic teachings. VOA

General debate

Valentine’s celebrations have increased in Pakistan over the last decade, particularly among the country’s youth.

The enforcement of the ban on its celebration and media coverage for a second consecutive year has sparked a larger debate among some of the country’s liberal and conservative circles.

A section of the society defends the celebrations and considers them harmless, though for others the day does not have any place in their religious practices or their traditions.

Pakistan, for the most part, is a conservative Muslim society. Public displays of affection are not the norm and often are viewed as unacceptable.

But some Pakistanis, like Saleema Hashmi, a Lahore-based artist, and renowned educator, believe the system is focusing on “irrelevant issues” at the expense of more important and pressing issues the country faces.

“Don’t our courts have better things to do instead of passing rulings on celebrating a mere romantic day?” she asked. “I do not understand how celebrating or denouncing Valentine’s Day can impact our religion, traditions, social or cultural norms.” (VOA)