Thursday October 24, 2019

Numbers of Woman Breastfeeding Their Babies in First Hour Declined in India

The US alone accounts for more than one-third of the 2.6 million babies in high-income countries who were never breastfed.

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The UN body released a new analysis on the number of babies missing out on breastfeeding which found that approximately 7.6 million babies each year were not breastfed globally.
Breastfeeding Mother, Pixabay

In India, while over 79 per cent of women deliver in a health institution, only 41.6 per cent of them breastfeed within the first hour, Unicef said on Thursday.

The UN body released a new analysis on the number of babies missing out on breastfeeding which found that approximately 7.6 million babies each year were not breastfed globally.

The analysis noted that babies were much more likely to be breastfed at least once in low- and-middle-income countries like Bhutan (99 per cent), Madagascar (99 per cent) and Peru (99 per cent) than those born in Ireland (55 per cent), the US (74 per cent) or Spain (77 per cent).

The US alone accounts for more than one-third of the 2.6 million babies in high-income countries who were never breastfed.

In India, while over 79 per cent of women deliver in a health institution, only 41.6 per cent of them breastfeed within the first hour, Unicef said on Thursday.
Representational Image, Pixabay

According to the Unicef, 95 per cent children in India at some point were breast fed in their early years.

“The National Family Health Survey (NFHS) data indicates that 54.9 per cent children are exclusively breastfed and exclusive breastfeeding is on an average for 2.9 months. Use of water and other fluids is one the main reasons for discontinuation of exclusive breastfeeding,” a Unicef statement said.

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“However, within low-and-middle-income countries, wealth disparities affect how long a mother will continue to breastfeed her child. Babies from the poorest families have rates for breastfeeding at 2 years that are 1.5 times higher than those from the richest families,” it added.

The gaps are widest in West and Central Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean, where babies from the poorest families have breastfeeding rates at two years that are nearly double those from wealthier families. (IANS)

Next Story

IITians Develop Affordable and Easy to Use Products to Help Boost Woman Hygiene

Set up about a year ago by Archit Agarwal and Harry Sehrawat, both students of IIT-Delhi, it has touched the Rs 1 crore revenue mark

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Products, Woman, Hygiene
One of such efforts is a startup named Sanfe. Pixabay

If you thought startups are all about technology, IITians are out to redefine that, smash taboos and create awareness around issues, like women hygiene, in their own innovative manner and ways.

One of such efforts is a startup named Sanfe. Set up about a year ago by Archit Agarwal and Harry Sehrawat, both students of IIT-Delhi, it has touched the Rs 1 crore revenue mark as per their claims.

On a trip to mountains, one of their female friends contracted urinary tract infection after using a dirty public washroom. It pushed them on the path of thinking and they realised over 50 per cent of Indian women face this kind of problem.

They decided to develop a device, which could be affordable and also easy to use. And thus came the ‘Stand and pee’. Priced at Rs 10 a piece, the device has registered good online sales.

Products, Woman, Hygiene
If you thought startups are all about technology, IITians are out to redefine that, smash taboos and create awareness around issues, like women hygiene, in their own innovative manner and ways. Pixabay

They also developed a special oil for women to get relief from period pain. According to them, relief roll on helps in immediate and long-lasting relaxation from period pain.

“The initial plan was to create a product to help women avoid dirty public washrooms. Later, we realised that there are lot of things that must be done to improve the state of female hygiene in India,” Sehrawat told IANS.

Another product that has been trying to bring a change in the society is an affordable device, developed by two students of IIT-Bombay and IIT-Goa. It helps clean reusable sanitary pads.

Devyani Maladkar (IIT-Goa) and Aishwarya Agarwal (IIT-Bombay) set up Cleanse Right to address the growing threat of menstrual waste to environment and public health. They invented an inexpensive and affordable device to clean reusable sanitary pads. It costs around Rs 1,500.

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“The machine has been designed in such a way that it rubs the cotton sanitary pads clean like human hands in a hygienic manner,” Aishwarya told IANS.

Both Sanfe and Cleanse Right are in the process of getting their inventions patented. However, while Sanfe has already hit the market with its products, the invention by Aishwarya and Devyani will have to wait for 2-3 years to be available commercially. (IANS)