Monday October 15, 2018

Nurse Greta Friedman kissed in iconic World War II Photo dies

Friedman, then 21 and a dental assistant, was in Times Square when the news of Japan's surrender to the US was announced on a billboard, marking the end of the war

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Kissing the war Good-Bye. Image source: Wikimedia Commons
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Washington, Sept 11, 2016: Greta Friedman, the woman kissed by a sailor in the iconic picture taken in New York city’s Times Square after the Second World War ended in 1945, has died, a media report said.
Her son Joshua Friedman confirmed the news to CNN on Saturday saying that his mother died at an assisted living home in Richmond, Virginia. She was 92.
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The black-and-white photograph of Friedman, dressed in a white uniform, being embraced and kissed by a sailor to celebrate the end of the war became an enduring image.
“My mom had so many stories and so many experiences; this was just one of many,” Friedman said about the iconic photo.
https://twitter.com/VeteransENG_CA/status/774292630377271296
Friedman, then 21 and a dental assistant, was in Times Square when the news of Japan’s surrender to the US was announced on a billboard, marking the end of the war,CNN reported.

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The photo, taken by legendary photographer Alfred Eisenstaedt, was published in Life magazine a few weeks later. But the identities of the two people were a mystery.
It was not until 1980 when both Friedman and George Mendonsa, the sailor in the photo, were determined to be the couple in the photo, CNN added. (IANS)
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  • Manthra koliyer

    Their culture has been modern since then!

  • Antara

    The legendary icon sure left something behind for today’s youth to idolize over!

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Researchers Have Successfully Created Artificial Placenta

Initial tests have already shown that the artificial placenta on the chip does in fact behave in a similar way to a natural placenta: small molecules are allowed to pass through, while large ones are held back, the researchers noted.

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Artificial placenta created in lab using 3D printing. Flickr
Artificial placenta created in lab using 3D printing. Flickr

Using a high-resolution 3D printing process, Austrian researchers have succeeded in creating an artificial placenta barrier on a chip, a development that can be used to investigate important aspects of nutrient transport from the mother to the foetus.

The placenta ensures the exchange of important substances between the mother and her unborn child, whilst simultaneously blocking other substances from passing through.

“The transport of substances through biological membranes plays an important role in various areas of medicine,” said Aleksandr Ovsianikov, professor at the TU Wien university in Vienna.

“These include the blood-brain barrier, ingestion of food in the stomach and intestine, and also the placenta.”

This can help provide clarity on how the exchange of glucose between mother and child takes place. Wikimedia Commons
This can help provide clarity on how the exchange of glucose between mother and child takes place. Wikimedia Commons

Studies have shown that diseases such as diabetes and high blood pressure in the mother can affect the transport of substances to the foetus. Until now however, it has been almost impossible to investigate the way in which the many parameters involved interact in such cases.

Using the 3D printing made it possible to produce customised hydrogel membranes directly within microfluidic chips, which are then populated with placenta cells.

This can help provide clarity on how the exchange of glucose between mother and child takes place, the researchers said.

The novel chip consists of two areas — one represents the foetus, the other the mother. Using a specially developed femtosecond laser-based 3D printing process helped produce a partition between them — the artificial placenta membrane.

The high-resolution 3D printing involved a hydrogel with good biocompatibility.

Also Read: Obesity During Pregnancy May up Kid’s Risk of Epilepsy

“Based on the model of the natural placenta, we produce a surface with small, curved villi. The placenta cells can then colonise it, creating a barrier very similar to the natural placenta,” Ovsianikov explained.

Initial tests have already shown that the artificial placenta on the chip does in fact behave in a similar way to a natural placenta: small molecules are allowed to pass through, while large ones are held back, the researchers noted. (IANS)