Monday April 22, 2019

Nuts May Boost Male Fertility

Nuts are dense foods containing many omega-3, antioxidants (vitamin C and E, selenium and zinc), and folate and other phytochemicals

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Nuts May Boost Male Fertility
Nuts May Boost Male Fertility. Pixabay

For men planning for fatherhood, regularly consuming a diet with 60 g of nuts can significantly improve the quality, quantity, and motility of sperm, results of a clinical trial has showed.

The results, presented at the 34th Annual Meeting of ESHRE in Barcelona, showed that a diet rich in nuts can boost sperm count nearly 20 per cent, sperm vitality nearly five per cent, sperm motility by six per cent, and morphology by one percent.

Eating nuts also showed a significant reduction in levels of sperm DNA fragmentation — a parameter closely associated with male infertility.

“Pollution, smoking, and trends toward a western-style diet” has led to a decline in quantity and quality of human sperm, said Albert Salas-Huetos from the Universitat Rovira i Virgil in Spain.

The study “supports a beneficial role for chronic nut consumption in sperm quality” and reflects a need for further investigations into male-specific dietary recommendations, he said.

nuts
Representational image. Pixabay

Nuts are dense foods containing many omega-3, antioxidants (vitamin C and E, selenium and zinc), and folate and other phytochemicals.

On being asked if men hoping to conceive a baby should add nuts to their everyday diet, he Salas-Huetos said, “We can’t yet say that based solely on the results of this study”.

Also Read: Antioxidant Supplements May not Improve Sperm Quality: Study

“But evidence is accumulating in the literature that healthy lifestyle changes such as following a healthy dietary pattern might help conception – and of course, nuts are a key component of a Mediterranean healthy diet,” he noted.

For the clinical trial, the team included 119 healthy young men aged 18-35 for a 14-week diet plan to either take their usual western-style diet without nuts or supplement it with 60 grams/day of mixed almonds, hazelnuts and walnuts. (IANS)

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Having a Handful of Nuts Everyday Can Boost Memory in Elderly, Says Study

According to the World Health Organization, the number of people living with dementia globally is at 47 million

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Representational image. Pixabay

While age is known as the strongest risk factor for cognitive decline, eating a handful of nuts every day can improve mental health and memory skills by up to 60 per cent, finds a study.

The findings showed that consuming nuts for a long period of time could be the key to better cognitive health, including improved thinking, reasoning and memory in older people.

“By eating more than 10 grams (or two teaspoons) of nuts per day older people could improve their cognitive function by up to 60 per cent — compared to those not eating nuts — effectively warding off what would normally be experienced as a natural two-year cognition decline,” said lead researcher Ming Li from the University of South Australia.

The reason could be because peanuts have specific anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects that help reduce cognitive decline including dementia.

Nuts are also known to be high in healthy fats, protein and fibre with nutritional properties that can lower cholesterol and improve cognitive health.

The study, published in The Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging, included 4,822 Chinese adults aged 55 and above.

Almonds and other nuts can improve survival of patients suffering from colon cancer as well.

According to the World Health Organization, the number of people living with dementia globally is at 47 million.

By 2030, this is projected to rise to 75 million and by 2050, global dementia cases are estimated to almost triple.

“Population ageing is one of the most substantial challenges of the twenty first century,” Li said.

“Not only are people living longer…they naturally experience changes to conceptual reasoning, memory, and processing speed.

Also Read- Excess Male Hormones in Women May up Blindness Risk: Study

“While there is no cure for age-related cognition decline and neurogenerative disease, variations in what people eat are delivering improvements for older people.

“If we can find ways to help older people retain their cognitive health and independence for longer – even by modifying their diet – then this is absolutely worth the effort,” Li suggested. (IANS)