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Obama eager to Campaign for Clinton in the US Presidential Election 2016

In 1988, Ronald Reagan had a major impact on George H.W. Bush’s bid for the White House, as did Theodore Roosevelt on William Taft’s victory in 1908

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Hillary Clinton. Image source: Wikimedia Commons
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  • Obama is extremely eager to help unite the Democratic party and hit the campaign trail to support its presidential nominee
  • Hillary Clinton is viewed as someone who can push forward Obama’s work beyond his presidency and help cement his legacy
  • Clinton possesses the ability and experience to serve as president
     

WHITE HOUSE- “We have got to make sure we get this election right,” Obama told supporters during a recent Democratic party fundraiser in Florida. Obama, with approval ratings of more than 50%, is the first sitting U.S. president in several decades who can impact the race to elect his successor to a great extent.

Obama is extremely eager to help unite the Democratic party and hit the campaign trail to support its presidential nominee, claim various Administration officials.  However, the White House object to this by saying that he will not make an endorsement until after a meeting with candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders on Thursday, June 9.

President George W. Bush and Barack Obama. Image source: Image source: Wikimedia Commons
President George W. Bush and Barack Obama. Image source: Image source: Wikimedia Commons

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“We take for granted the incredible progress that we’ve made across every dimension of the economy, security, a society that’s more tolerant and more accepting of diversity,” Obama said. “We’ve got a lot of stuff to build on.”

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, who claimed the Democratic presidential nomination after decisive primary victories on Tuesday, is viewed as someone who can push forward Obama’s work beyond his presidency and help cement his legacy.

Obama is also ready to burst onto the campaign stage to counter controversial rhetoric by Donald Trump, the presumptive Republican nominee.

Trump’s own party leaders have criticized some of his remarks as divisive and racist, and the president has said Trump’s foreign policy statements have “rattled” world leaders.

 Donald Trump speaking with supporters at a campaign rally at the South Point Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada in 2016. Wikimedia commons.
Donald Trump speaking with supporters at a campaign rally at the South Point Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada in 2016. Wikimedia commons.

Treading carefully and running ‘scared’

Mindful of the need to keep the Democratic Party united and energized to win the November presidential election, the U.S. leader did not step forward immediately to endorse Clinton after her decisive primary victories on Tuesday.

Instead, Obama telephoned both Clinton and her Democratic rival, Bernie Sanders.

The Vermont senator has garnered the support of millions of voters, particularly those under 30, with a consistently forceful message against the corrosive sway of special interests in Washington and rising income inequality in America.

At Sanders’ request, Obama will meet with the senator at the White House on Thursday to discuss “how to build on the extraordinary work he has done to engage millions of Democratic voters, and to build on that enthusiasm in the weeks and months ahead,” according to a statement by Press Secretary Josh Earnest.

While the president has expressed confidence in the Democratic party’s ability to win the White house and other key races, he has told supporters, “I want us to run scared the whole time.”

Giving Clinton ‘sizzle’

Obama congratulated Clinton for securing the delegates necessary to clinch the Democratic nomination.

With an unfavorable rating of more than 50 percent in most polls, Clinton has much to gain from the backing of a popular president who is widely respected as a party leader and on the global stage.

“It has been a long time since a sitting president became the super campaign cheerleader for a candidate,” said Douglas Brinkley, Rice University presidential historian.

In 1988, Ronald Reagan had a major impact on George H.W. Bush’s bid for the White House, as did Theodore Roosevelt on William Taft’s victory in 1908.

Clinton possesses the ability and experience to serve as president, said Brinkley. However, she does not have the ability to connect with the public in a way Obama and her husband, former President Bill Clinton do. Also, her image has been tarnished by a series of scandals
“Hillary Clinton is not the most charismatic public speaker. She’s worked on it,” said Brinkley. “But the kind of sizzle factor that President Obama can bring, after winning two terms in a row, will be an immeasurable help to her.”

“Barack Obama knows how to bring out the college students, in a way that Bernie Sanders did. He’s popular with young people. And she sorely needs to energize younger voters,“ Brinkley noted.

Obama is also highly popular among key voting blocs, such as African Americans, Latinos, and younger voters. He wants to ensure the next president will carry forward his signature accomplishments, like passage of the Affordable Care Act.

“It’s almost like he’s running for a third term for president,” said Brinkley.

-prepared by Devika Todi (with inputs from VOA), an intern at NewsGram. Twitter: devika_todi

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Here’s The List Of US Jobs With Highest Gender Gap in Wages

Overall, the pay gap has narrowed in the last 50 years, according to the Census Bureau’s Laughlin.

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gender gap
In this May 24, 2018, photo, Rosa Franco, director of lending at Neighborhood Trust Federal Credit Union talks with employees at the bank in New York. Franco says the credit union's partnership with Finhabits is still in development and she anticipates a challenge in marketing the service to her clients, many of whom are consumed by pressing concerns like debt repayment and or sending money to relatives abroad. VOA

By now, we all know there’s a significant gender gap — that women earn less money than men even when doing the same work.

In 2016, women earned an average of $40,675, far less than the $50,741 for men, according Lynda Laughlin of the U.S. Census Bureau.

The bureau finds that the gender gap is largest in fields dominated by men, such as when it comes to being the chief executive of a company. While male CEOs make an average of $141,000 annually, women in the same job picked up about $104,000 — that’s 73 percent of what the guys earn for doing the same work, according to the American Community Survey.

gender gap
Graphic — US Census Bureau. VOA

Other professions where the gap is most significant include sales and finance. For example, male financial advisors are paid an average of $102,000 while women in the same field end up with $69,000. That means the women are earning about 70 cents for every dollar a man makes.

Many of the highest paid jobs for women, including physician, surgeon, nurse anesthetist and dentist, are in health fields.

The gender gap between men and women is lowest among pharmacists, where the women earn 97 cents for every dollar their male colleagues make.

Even the best education can’t close the void.

In fact, an analysis of numbers from the U.S. Department of Education finds that the disparity might even be wider for men and women who are graduates of America’s most elite universities.

gender gap
Colleges with biggest gender gap. VOA

he average man in that study pulls in a salary of $59,000 soon after graduating, but his female counterparts make 19 percent less, earning about $48,000. Of the 117 top-ranked colleges in the analysis, women came out financially on top in only three schools: Yale University, Clark University, and Stevens Institute of Technology. Female graduates earn less than males for all of the other schools, and often by a significant amount.

The 10 universities where the pay gap is most significant include some of the nation’s most prestigious. At No. 1 is Stanford University, where women graduates end up earning $36,000 less than their former fellow male students. Also on the list are Princeton, Harvard, MIT and Duke University.

Also Read: The European Union Warns Facebook Over Consumer’s Data Usage

Overall, the pay gap has narrowed in the last 50 years, according to the Census Bureau’s Laughlin, due in part to the increasing presence of women in the work force and their attainment of higher levels of education. (VOA)