Thursday November 14, 2019

Obese? Blame it on Fat Cells’ Expansion

According to researchers, the mechanics of 'cellular expansion' plays a pivotal role in fat production

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Obese? Blame it on Fat Cells' Expansion
Obese? Blame it on Fat Cells' Expansion. VOA

You have heard about obesity or accumulation of fat but do you know that nutrition is not the only factor driving obesity in our kids?

According to researchers, the mechanics of ‘cellular expansion’ plays a pivotal role in fat production.

To understand how obesity develops, a team from Tel Aviv University in Israel used state-of-the-art technology to analyse the accumulation of fat in the body at the cellular level.

“We wanted to find out why a sedentary lifestyle results in obesity, other than making time to eat more hamburgers,” said professor Amit Gefen from Tel Aviv University’s department of biomedical engineering.

“We found that fat cells exposed to sustained, chronic pressure – such as what happens to the buttocks when you are sitting down – experienced accelerated growth of lipid droplets, which are molecules that carry fats,” Gefen added.

Contrary to muscle and bone tissue, which get mechanically weaker with disuse, fat depots in fat cells expanded when they experienced sustained loading by as much as 50 percent. This was a substantial discovery.

The researchers discovered that, once it accumulated lipid droplets, the structure of a cell and its mechanics changed dramatically.

obesity
Representational image. Pixabay

Using a cutting-edge atomic force microscope and other microscopy technologies, they were able to observe the material composition of the transforming fat cell, which became stiffer as it expanded.

This stiffness alters the environment of surrounding cells by physically deforming them, pushing them to change their own shape and composition.

“When they gain mass and change their composition, expanding cells deform neighbouring cells, forcing them to differentiate and expand,” he explained.

Also Read: Kids Who Sleep Less Eat More

This proves that you are not just what you eat. You are also what you feel – and what you are feeling is the pressure of increased weight and the sustained loading in the tissues of the buttocks of the couch potato.

If you can learn to control the mechanical environment of cells, you can then determine how to modulate the fat cells to produce less fat, Natan Shaked from Tel Aviv University noted.

The team is now creating a platform to develop new therapies and technologies to prevent or even reverse fat gain, said the research published in the Biophysical Journal. (Bollywood Country)

Next Story

Impaired Liver Function During Pregnancy Leads To Obese Kids

Impaired liver function during pregnancy increases the risks of obesity in kids

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Pregnancy
Impaired liver function during pregnancy may increase the risk of obesity in children. PIxabay

Impaired liver function during pregnancy may alter gut bacteria composition and increase the risk of obesity in children, according to a new study.

In a rodent of model of the most common liver disease in pregnancy, the composition of gut bacteria in offspring was altered and liver function impaired, particularly when they were fed a Western-style, high-fat diet.

“These findings further suggest that health during pregnancy can have long-term effects on children. In this case they suggest that gut microbiome alterations, may increase the risk of obesity in children, when fed a western style, high-fat diet, ” said study researcher Caroline Ovadia from King’s College London.

The most common liver disease in pregnancy, intrahepatic cholestasis (ICP), reduces the release of digestive fluid bile from the liver causing bile acids to build up in the blood, impairing liver function. This causes severe itching in the mother and increases risks of stillbirth and preterm birth for the baby.

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In a rodent of model of the most common liver disease in pregnancy, the composition of gut bacteria in offspring was altered and liver function impaired. Pixabay

Previous studies suggest that children of women with ICP are more likely to develop childhood obesity.

For the findings, the research team investigated how gut microbiota are affected in the offspring of a mouse model of ICP.

The results reported that the offspring had a different gut microbiome composition and liver function, particularly when fed a high-fat diet, which could contribute to impaired metabolism and increase risk of obesity.

The results suggest that mice born to mothers with ICP, or other liver diseases, may benefit from maintaining a healthy diet and should avoid fatty foods.

These findings also suggest that targeting microbiome composition with treatment strategies in pregnant women, such as using pre-biotics or pro-biotics, could help prevent the risk of child obesity.

Also Read- Parents With Only Child More Likely To Tackle Obese Kids

“Understanding changes in composition of the gut microbiome and their effects may provide new ways of diagnosing patients at particular risk of obesity before it occurs. We could then develop personalised medicine and target appropriate treatments to alter gut bacteria accordingly,” Ovadia added.

The study was presented at The Society for Endocrinology Annual Conference in the UK. (IANS)