Monday January 20, 2020

Obese People Have Increased Chances of Surviving a Stroke

For the study, the team looked at 1,033 stroke-affected people with an average age of 71 and an average body mass index (BMI) of 27.5

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Obesity
An overweight woman sits on a chair in Times Square in New York, May 8, 2012. (Representational image). VOA

While obesity has known to be a key risk factor in many diseases, a new study suggests having some extra body fat may be linked to an increased chance of surviving a stroke.

“It was noticed that carrying extra weight may play a role in survival for people who had suffered from kidney and heart disease, We felt the need to investigate whether it also was tied to improved stroke survival,” said Zuolu Liu, researcher at the University of California-Los Angeles.

The study, presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 71st annual meeting in the US, found that severely obese people were 62 per cent less likely to die than people of normal weight.

Obese people were 46 per cent less likely to die after a stroke and those who were overweight had 15 per cent more chances of survival.

Representational image.
Overweight people have better chances of survival from stroke: Study. Pixabay

Conversely, underweight people were 67 per cent more likely to die after a stroke than people of normal weight.

The condition called the obesity paradox suggests being overweight may be protective for some, such as old people or those with certain chronic diseases.

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“One possible explanation is people who are overweight or obese may have a nutritional reserve that may help them survive during prolonged illness. More research is needed to investigate the relationship between body mass index and stroke,” Liu stated.

For the study, the team looked at 1,033 stroke-affected people with an average age of 71 and an average body mass index (BMI) of 27.5. (IANS)

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Lazy Infants More Likely to Suffer From Obesity

Less active babies have higher obesity risk

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Infant obesity
Less active infants may accumulate more fat, which in turn may put them at risk for obesity later in life. Pixabay

Parents, please take note. Researchers have revealed that less active infants may accumulate more fat, which in turn may put them at risk for obesity later in life.

For the study, published in the journal Obesity, researchers tracked the physical activity levels of 506 infants using small ankle-worn accelerometers for four days per tracking period at ages 3, 6, 9, and 12 months.

For each tracking period after 3, average physical activity increased by about four per cent, in line with infants becoming generally more mobile and active over the course of their first year.

Among infants, higher physical activity measured by the accelerometer was associated with lower central adiposity, a measure of lower-torso fat accumulation, the study said.

Infant obesity
These days, infants are spending more and more sedentary time in car seats, high chairs, strollers and it may lead to obesity. Pixabay

“This is the first study to demonstrate an association over time between higher levels of objectively measured physical activity and lower central adiposity in infancy,” said study lead author Sara Benjamin-Neelon from Johns Hopkins University in US.

The study was part of a larger study of infant growth and obesity, called the Nurture study, which covered 666 mothers and their infants from the greater Durham, North Carolina, area during 2013 to 2016.

Of this group, the research team were able to get adequate accelerometer data for 506 infants.

“Some evidence suggests that the earlier you can get infants crawling and walking, and providing them with opportunities to move freely throughout the day, the more you can help protect them against later obesity,” Benjamin-Neelon said.

The study found that among the infants in the study, an increase in recorded activity by one “standard deviation”–essentially a standard proportion of the range of the data–was associated with a small but significant decrease in central adiposity.

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The researcher noted that larger, longer-term studies will be necessary to determine the sustained effect of infant physical activity, but that preventing extended periods of inactivity for infants will almost certainly be good for them.

“These days, infants are spending more and more sedentary time in car seats, high chairs, strollers–and perhaps we haven’t thought enough about the developmental ramifications of these types of restrictive devices,” Benjamin-Neelon concluded. (IANS)