Tuesday October 22, 2019

Obese People Have Increased Chances of Surviving a Stroke

For the study, the team looked at 1,033 stroke-affected people with an average age of 71 and an average body mass index (BMI) of 27.5

0
//
Obesity
An overweight woman sits on a chair in Times Square in New York, May 8, 2012. (Representational image). VOA

While obesity has known to be a key risk factor in many diseases, a new study suggests having some extra body fat may be linked to an increased chance of surviving a stroke.

“It was noticed that carrying extra weight may play a role in survival for people who had suffered from kidney and heart disease, We felt the need to investigate whether it also was tied to improved stroke survival,” said Zuolu Liu, researcher at the University of California-Los Angeles.

The study, presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 71st annual meeting in the US, found that severely obese people were 62 per cent less likely to die than people of normal weight.

Obese people were 46 per cent less likely to die after a stroke and those who were overweight had 15 per cent more chances of survival.

Representational image.
Overweight people have better chances of survival from stroke: Study. Pixabay

Conversely, underweight people were 67 per cent more likely to die after a stroke than people of normal weight.

The condition called the obesity paradox suggests being overweight may be protective for some, such as old people or those with certain chronic diseases.

Also Read- Researchers Discover Enzyme Inhibitor To Treat Deadly Brain Tumours in Kids

“One possible explanation is people who are overweight or obese may have a nutritional reserve that may help them survive during prolonged illness. More research is needed to investigate the relationship between body mass index and stroke,” Liu stated.

For the study, the team looked at 1,033 stroke-affected people with an average age of 71 and an average body mass index (BMI) of 27.5. (IANS)

Next Story

Fatty Tissues Accumulate Inside Lungs of Obese People: Study

The researchers examined post-mortem samples of the lungs that had been donated for the research and stored in the Airway Tissue Biobank

0
Obese
Excess fat accumulates in the airway walls of Obese people where it takes up space and seems to increase inflammation within the lungs. Pixabay

Researchers have found that fatty tissues accumulate in the airway walls, particularly in people who are overweight or obese.

The study, published in the European Respiratory Journal, suggested that the fatty tissue alters the structure of people’s airways and this could be one reason behind the increased risk of asthma.

“Our research team studies the structure of the airways within our lungs and how these are altered in people with respiratory disease,” said the study’s author John Elliot from Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital in Australia.

“Looking at the samples of lungs, we spotted fatty tissue that had built up in the airway walls. We wanted to see if this accumulation was correlated with body weight,” Elliot said.

The researchers examined post-mortem samples of the lungs that had been donated for the research and stored in the Airway Tissue Biobank.

They studied samples from 52 people, including 15 who had no asthma, 21 who had the disease but died of other causes and 16 who died of asthma.

Using dyes to help visualise the structures of 1373 airways under a microscope, they identified and quantified any fatty tissue present.

Obese
Fatty tissue alters the structure of Obese people’s airways and this could be one reason behind the increased risk of asthma. Pixabay

They compared this data with each person’s body mass index (BMI).

The study showed that fatty tissue accumulates in the walls of the airways. The analysis revealed that the amount of fat present increases in line with increasing BMI.

“We’ve found that excess fat accumulates in the airway walls where it takes up space and seems to increase inflammation within the lungs,” said the study’s co-author Peter Noble.

ALSO READ: Playing Sports Linked with Lower Mental Health Issues: Study

“We think this is causing a thickening of the airways that limits the flow of air in and out of the lungs, and that could at least partly explain an increase in asthma symptoms,” Noble said. (IANS)