Saturday January 18, 2020

Obese Women Can Boost Baby’s Health by Losing Weight During Pregnancy

Are you pregnant and very obese? If so, shedding those extra kilos may ensure good health for your baby, claims a new study challenging notions on weight during pregnancy. The study revealed that the optimal weight gain for women would give them a balanced risk of having a very small or very large baby.

0
//
New mom with her baby.
New mom with her baby. Pixabay

Are you pregnant and very obese? If so, shedding those extra kilos may ensure good health for your baby, claims a new study challenging notions on weight during pregnancy.

The study revealed that the optimal weight gain for women would give them a balanced risk of having a very small or very large baby.

There is a strong link between the weight of the mother and the baby: very underweight mothers tend to have smaller babies — called small for gestational age (SGA) babies — and morbidly obese mothers tend to have more large for gestational age (LGA) babies.

These babies are at higher risk of conditions like heart attacks, hypertension, obesity and diabetes as adults than babies born at normal weight.

According to the study, published in the journal Heliyon, although the current recommendations are correct for women with a normal BMI, they are not correct for underweight or obese women.

Foetal immune rejection may be one of the causes for preterm labour -- a common pregnancy complication leading to birth occurring before the 37th week of pregnancy, researchers say.
Pregnant Woman, Pixabay

Thus, a woman with a body mass index (BMI) of 17 should gain about 22 kg instead of the recommended 12.5-18 kg.

An obese woman with a BMI of 32 should gain 3.6 kg instead of the recommended 5-9 kg. And a very obese woman with a BMI of 40 should actually lose 6 kg.

“We were surprised to find such a linear connection between BMI, weight gain and MFCS,” said lead author Pierre-Yves Robillard from Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Sud Reunion in France.

“While our results show the recommendations are fine for women in the normal weight range, we have shown they are not ideal for very underweight and very overweight women.”

working mothers
Mother holding a baby. Pixabay

Robillard and the team carried out a 16.5-year observational study. They recorded the pre-pregnancy BMI, weight gain, and weight of the baby of 52,092 women who gave birth at full term.

Also Read: Affects of Prenatal Marijuana on Baby

Current recommendations should be changed for underweight and very obese women, the researchers said.

“The results of our research provide a solution to the conundrum affecting the 135 million pregnancies per year on this planet,” Robillard said. (IANS)

Next Story

Over 95% Women Feel That Abortion Was The Right Decision: Study

Over 95% women do not regret having an abortion says a new study

0
women abortion
According to a new study, over 95% women do not regret the decision of having an abortion. Pixabay

Researchers have found that even five years down the line after having an abortion, over 95 per cent of the women said it was the right decision for them.

Published in the journal Social Science & Medicine, the study found no evidence that women began to regret their decisions as years passed.

On the contrary, the women reported that both their positive and negative feelings about the abortion diminished over time. At five years, the overwhelming majority (84 per cent) had either positive feelings, or none at all.

“Even if they had difficulty making the decision initially, or if they felt their community would not approve, our research shows that the overwhelming majority of women who obtain abortions continue to believe it was the right decision,” said study researcher Corinne Rocca, Associate Professor at University of California in the US.

“This debunks the idea that most women suffer emotionally from having an abortion,” Rocca added.

abortion
Most women suffer emotionally from having an abortion. Pixabay

For the findings, the researchers analysed data from the Turnaway Study, a five-year effort to understand the health and socioeconomic consequences for nearly 1,000 women who sought abortions in 21 states around the country.

The analysis included 667 participants who had abortions at the start of the study. The women were surveyed a week after they sought care and every six months thereafter, for a total of 11 times.

While women did not report regretting their decision, many did struggle initially to make it. Just over half said the decision to terminate their pregnancy was very difficult (27 per cent) or somewhat difficult (27 pe rcent), while the rest (46 percent) said it was not difficult.

About 70 per cent also reported feeling they would be stigmatised by their communities if people knew they had sought an abortion, with 29 per cent reporting low levels and 31 percent reporting high levels of community stigma. Those who struggled with their decisions or felt stigmatized were more likely to experience sadness, guilt and anger shortly after obtaining the abortion.

Over time, however, the number of women reporting these negative emotions declined dramatically, particularly in the first year after their abortion. This was also true for those who initially struggled with their decision.

And relief was the most prominent emotion reported by all groups at the end of the study — just as it was at every time point in the study.

Also Read- Guide Yourself on a Path of Self-Discovery this New Year

“This research goes further than previous studies, in that it follows women for longer, and was conducted on a larger sample from many different clinics throughout the US,” said Julia Steinberg from University of Maryland.

“It shows that women remain certain in their decision to get an abortion over time. These results clearly disprove claims that regret is likely after abortion,” Steinberg said. (IANS)