Thursday August 22, 2019

Obesity During Pregnancy May up Kids’ Risk of Epilepsy

In addition, complications related to neonatal-asphyxia -- the state of being deprived of oxygen --, as well as less severe neonatal complications, were also independently associated with increased risk of childhood epilepsy

0
//
Pregnancy, autism
Pregnancy after breast cancer does not increase a woman's risk of a relapse. Pixabay

Women who are overweight or obese during their pregnancy may significantly increase the risk for children developing epilepsy, a study has showed.

Epilepsy is a disorder in which nerve cell activity in the brain is disturbed, causing seizures.

The results showed that the risk of epilepsy increased by 11 per cent in children of overweight mothers (BMI of 25 to less than 30) compared with children and normal-weight mothers.

While women with grade I obesity (BMI 30 to less than 35) increased the risk 20 by per cent, those with grade II obesity (BMI 35 to less than 40) raised the risk by 30 per cent.

The risk for children with mothers in the grade III obesity category was 82 per cent.

Pregnancy
Representational image. Pixabay

“Given that overweight and obesity are potentially modifiable risk factors, prevention of obesity in women of reproductive age may be an important public health strategy to reduce the incidence of epilepsy,” said Neda Razaz, from the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden.

Maternal overweight and obesity may increase the risk of brain injury, leading to a range of neurodevelopmental disorders, or that maternal obesity might affect neurodevelopment through obesity-induced inflammation, leading to epilepsy, the researchers argued, in the article published online by JAMA Neurology.

Also Read: How to Protect Skin From Sunburn

In addition, complications related to neonatal-asphyxia — the state of being deprived of oxygen –, as well as less severe neonatal complications, were also independently associated with increased risk of childhood epilepsy. (Bollywood Country)

Next Story

Heart Disease, Stroke-related Deaths on Rise Due to Obesity: Study

The researchers observed that obesity is the main risk factors for cardiovascular disease mortality — others include smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes

0
obese children
India with 14.4 million had the second highest number of obese children in 2015. Pixabay

Heart disease and stroke mortality rates have almost stopped declining in many high-income countries and are even increasing in some countries, reveals a new study.

For the study, published in the International Journal of Epidemiology, researchers from the University of Melbourne analysed trends in cardiovascular disease mortality, which consists of mainly heart disease and stroke — in 23 high-income countries since the year 2000.

The study found that cardiovascular disease mortality rates for people aged 35 to 74 years are now barely declining, or are increasing, in 12 of the 23 countries.

Cardiovascular disease mortality rates have increased in the most recent years in US and Canadian females, while in Australia, the UK and New Zealand annual declines in deaths from cardiovascular diseases are now 20 to 50 per cent.

obesity
Two women converse in New York, June 26, 2012. The nation’s obesity epidemic continues to grow, led by an alarming increase among women. Obesity is one of the risk factors of heart failure. VOA

“Research suggests that obesity, or at least poor diet, may have been a significant contributor to the slowdown in the decline of cardiovascular disease deaths,” said Alan Lopez, Professor at the University of Melbourne.

“Each of these countries have very high levels of obesity. In Australia, close to one-third of adults are obese,” Lopez said.

Also Read: Google Fit Can Now Track Users’ Sleep Patterns

The researchers observed that obesity is the main risk factors for cardiovascular disease mortality — others include smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes.

“Failure to address these issues could confirm the end of the long-term decline in cardiovascular disease deaths and threaten future gains in life expectancy.” concluded study’s co-author Tim Adair, a researcher at the varsity. (IANS)