Saturday December 7, 2019

Obesity During Pregnancy May up Kids’ Risk of Epilepsy

In addition, complications related to neonatal-asphyxia -- the state of being deprived of oxygen --, as well as less severe neonatal complications, were also independently associated with increased risk of childhood epilepsy

0
//
Pregnancy, autism
Pregnancy after breast cancer does not increase a woman's risk of a relapse. Pixabay

Women who are overweight or obese during their pregnancy may significantly increase the risk for children developing epilepsy, a study has showed.

Epilepsy is a disorder in which nerve cell activity in the brain is disturbed, causing seizures.

The results showed that the risk of epilepsy increased by 11 per cent in children of overweight mothers (BMI of 25 to less than 30) compared with children and normal-weight mothers.

While women with grade I obesity (BMI 30 to less than 35) increased the risk 20 by per cent, those with grade II obesity (BMI 35 to less than 40) raised the risk by 30 per cent.

The risk for children with mothers in the grade III obesity category was 82 per cent.

Pregnancy
Representational image. Pixabay

“Given that overweight and obesity are potentially modifiable risk factors, prevention of obesity in women of reproductive age may be an important public health strategy to reduce the incidence of epilepsy,” said Neda Razaz, from the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden.

Maternal overweight and obesity may increase the risk of brain injury, leading to a range of neurodevelopmental disorders, or that maternal obesity might affect neurodevelopment through obesity-induced inflammation, leading to epilepsy, the researchers argued, in the article published online by JAMA Neurology.

Also Read: How to Protect Skin From Sunburn

In addition, complications related to neonatal-asphyxia — the state of being deprived of oxygen –, as well as less severe neonatal complications, were also independently associated with increased risk of childhood epilepsy. (Bollywood Country)

Next Story

Parents With Single Child More Likely to Tackle an Obese Kid: Study

Researchers found mothers of singleton children were more likely to be obese themselves

0
Child
Researchers have found that only Child, who researchers refer to as 'singleton,' have less healthy family eating practices, beverage choices, and total Healthy Eating Index 2010 score, coming in lower on three out of the 12 areas measured. Pixabay

Parents with only Child are more likely to tackle an obese kid as children without siblings may be at a higher risk of gaining weight than those who have brothers and sisters, say researchers.

This is because families with multiple children tend to make more healthy eating decisions than families with a single child, the study added.

The study, published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, found that this kind of obesity could be seven times more common among youngsters.

“Healthier eating behaviours and patterns may result from household-level changes rather than peer exposure, as peer exposure is also present in away-from-home care,” said study lead author Chelsea L. Kracht from the University of Oklahoma in the US.

According to the researchers, data was self-reported in daily food logs kept by mothers over the course of three days — two weekdays and one weekend day. Teachers kept logs by proxy for any food children ate while at school.

Mothers also completed the Family Nutrition and Physical Activity questionnaire to evaluate typical family eating behaviour like food and beverage choice.

Child
Parents with only Child are more likely to tackle an obese kid as children without siblings may be at a higher risk of gaining weight than those who have brothers and sisters, say researchers. Pixabay

Researchers have found that only-children, who researchers refer to as ‘singletons,’ had less healthy family eating practices, beverage choices, and total Healthy Eating Index 2010 score, coming in lower on three out of the 12 areas measured.

They also had significantly lower total scores across weekdays, weekends, and on average, indicating there are both individual and collective differences in eating patterns between the groups.

Researchers found mothers of singleton children were more likely to be obese themselves. Moreover, maternal BMI had a much stronger connection to child BMI percentile and waist circumference percentile than singleton status.

Maternal BMI did not significantly contribute to overall eating patterns but did contribute to empty calories.

Child
Families with multiple children tend to make more healthy eating decisions than families with a single Child, the study added. Pixabay

The research also found that time spent in away-from-home care like school and daycare was not connected to children’s eating patterns.

“Nutrition professionals must consider the influence of family and siblings to provide appropriate and tailored nutrition education for families of young children,” said Kracht.

ALSO READ: Escalating Consequences of Climate Change Hit Countries Globally

“Efforts to help all children and families establish healthy eating habits and practices must be encouraged,” Kracht added. (IANS)