Saturday May 26, 2018

Obesity has association with blood clots seen in children

0
//
59
Republish
Reprint

New York: Obesity has an association with the formation of blood clots in the veins of children and adolescents, says a new study.

Obesity, as determined by body mass index, was a statistically significant predictor of blood clot formation in juveniles, the study showed.

The association between obesity and venous thromboembolism (VTE) — the formation of blood clots — can cause both acute and chronic health problems if left untreated, the researchers warned.

Elizabeth Halvorson, assistant professor at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in North Carolina, US. expressed the major findings of the study.

Our study demonstrated an association between obesity and VTE in children, which should be explored further in larger future studies,

This is important because the incidence of pediatric VTE has increased dramatically over the last 20 years and childhood obesity remains highly prevalent in the US,” she added.

For the study, the researchers conducted a retrospective chart review of patients at Wake Forest Baptist’s Brenner Children’s Hospital between January 2000 and September 2012. They identified 88 patients between ages 2-18 who confirmed cases of VTE.

After adjusting for the other risk factors – among them bloodstream infection and time spent in an intensive care unit – the researchers found a small but statistically significant association between obesity and VTE.

The research was published in the journal Hospital Pediatrics.

(Inputs from IANS)

(Picture Courtesy: www.mapsofindia.com)

 

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2016 NewsGram

Next Story

Study Shows Weight Loss Surgery Can Reduce Risk of Skin Cancer

Bariatric surgery, a weight loss operation, is associated with a 61 per cent decrease in the risk of developing malignant skin cancer, according to a study.

0
//
18
Bariatric Surgery
representational image. Pixabay

Bariatric surgery, a weight loss operation, is associated with a 61 per cent decrease in the risk of developing malignant skin cancer, according to a study.

Melanoma is a deadly form of skin cancer, most closely associated with excessive sun exposure. Obesity is an established risk factor for cancer and some studies indicate that intentional weight loss sometimes reduces the risk.

However, evidence for a link between obesity, weight loss and malignant melanoma is limited.

The new findings showed that bariatric surgery led to a 42 per cent reduced risk of skin cancer in general compared to controls given usual obesity care.

The study “supports the idea that obesity is a melanoma risk factor and indicates that weight loss in individuals with obesity can reduce the risk of bariatric surgery that has increased steadily in many countries over several decades”, said lead author Magdalena Taube from the University of Gothenburg in Sweden.

Cancer word on newspaper
Cancer. Pixabay

The results were presented at the 2018 European Congress on Obesity in Vienna, Austria.

The protective effect of bariatric surgery on skin cancer was observed in a group of 2,007 obese participants who were then followed for a median of 18 years.

These were compared with a control group consisting of 2,040 individuals who matched with the participants who underwent surgery on sex, age, anthropometric measurements, cardiovascular risk factors, psychosocial variables and personality traits.

Also Read: Study Shows that Humans Are Influencing Cancer in Wild Animals

To analyse malignant melanoma incidence, statistical tests were used to compare time to first melanoma cancer diagnosis between the surgery and control groups.

In additional analyses, risk ratios between the surgery and control groups were compared. (IANS)

Next Story