Saturday May 25, 2019

Obesity and Overweight Linked to Long-Term Health Problems After Traumatic Brain Injury

The frequency of seizures -- a common problem among TBI survivors -- was also related to differences in body weight and health status

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BMI, Asthma Risk
High BMI in early life is linked to asthma risk later: Study. Pixabay

While obesity has been known to increase the risk of many cardiometabolic diseases in healthy people, it may pose even greater risk for people living with traumatic brain injury (TBI), a study has found.

The study found that for people with moderate to severe TBI, obesity may be associated with long term chronic disease risks including high blood pressure, heart failure, and diabetes.

In TBI patients, weight gain may occur due to a wide range of factors including medical conditions, medications, cognitive or behavioural changes, physical limitations, and lack of transportation or other resources.

“Being obese or overweight presents a health risk in the years following rehabilitation for TBI,” said lead author Laura E. Dreer from The University of Alabama in the US.

weight gain may occur due to a wide range of factors including medical conditions, medications, cognitive or behavioural changes, physical limitations, and lack of transportation or other resources
Weight gain may occur due to a wide range of factors including medical conditions, medications, cognitive or behavioural changes, physical limitations, and lack of transportation or other resources. Pixabay

“Achieving and maintaining a healthy diet and engaging in regular physical activity following a TBI are critical goals for recovery,” Dreer added.

In the study, published in Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, 7,287 obese patients with TBI who had undergone inpatient acute rehabilitation, rated themselves as having poorer general health.

Also Read: Abdominal Obesity Linked to Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms

The frequency of seizures — a common problem among TBI survivors — was also related to differences in body weight and health status.

“Lifestyle and health behaviours related to weight gain will need to be a component of any proactive approach to managing TBI as a chronic health condition,” Dreer said. (IANS)

Next Story

Walking, Cycling Reduce Obesity Risk in Kids: Study

For the study, the researchers included over 2,000 primary school children

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Walking
Walk your way to good health.

Do your children go to school walking or riding a bicycle? If your anser is in affirmative, then they are less likely to be obese than those who use car or public transport, suggests a new study.

The study’s findings suggested children who actively commuted to school had lower body fat and were less likely to be overweight or obese.

In the study, published in the BMC Public Health journal, the researchers assessed the impact of extra-curricular physical activities — daily commuting to school and participation in sports — on overweight and obesity levels among primary school children.

The researchers observed that physical activity was better predictor of obesity level in children than commonly-used body-mass index (BMI) as it looked at total weight, including “healthy” muscle mass, rather than fat mass alone.

“Both BMI itself and the points at which high BMI is associated with poor health vary with age, sex and ethnicity,” said the study’s first author Lander Bosch, a Ph.D scholar at University of Cambridge.

“While adjustments have been made in recent years to account for these variations, BMI remains a flawed way to measure the health risks associated with obesity,” Bosch said.

CyclingStress, meditation, PTSD
Cycling, walking in nature may also improve your mental health. Pixabay

For the study, the researchers included over 2,000 primary school children.

Likewise, the researchers also used BMI to check obesity risk in children. Surprisingly, children who participated in sports daily appeared more likely to be overweight compared with those who engaged in sports less than once a week.

Also Read- Drinking Coffee Improves Bowel Movement, Find Researchers

“The link between frequent participation in sport and obesity levels has generated inconsistent findings in previous research, but many of these studies were looking at BMI only,” asserted Bosch.

“However, when looking at body fat instead, we showed there was a trend whereby children who were not active were more likely to be overweight or obese. It’s likely that when looking at the BMI, some inactive children aren’t classified as obese due to reduced muscle mass,” he noted.

The researchers maintained that active commuting to school could be “promising” for combating childhood obesity. “It’s something so easy to implement and it makes such a big difference,” said Bosch. (IANS)