Monday July 16, 2018

Obesity and Overweight Linked to Long-Term Health Problems After Traumatic Brain Injury

The frequency of seizures -- a common problem among TBI survivors -- was also related to differences in body weight and health status

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Lifestyle and health behaviours related to weight gain will need to be a component of any proactive approach to managing TBI as a chronic health condition, Pixabay
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While obesity has been known to increase the risk of many cardiometabolic diseases in healthy people, it may pose even greater risk for people living with traumatic brain injury (TBI), a study has found.

The study found that for people with moderate to severe TBI, obesity may be associated with long term chronic disease risks including high blood pressure, heart failure, and diabetes.

In TBI patients, weight gain may occur due to a wide range of factors including medical conditions, medications, cognitive or behavioural changes, physical limitations, and lack of transportation or other resources.

“Being obese or overweight presents a health risk in the years following rehabilitation for TBI,” said lead author Laura E. Dreer from The University of Alabama in the US.

weight gain may occur due to a wide range of factors including medical conditions, medications, cognitive or behavioural changes, physical limitations, and lack of transportation or other resources
Weight gain may occur due to a wide range of factors including medical conditions, medications, cognitive or behavioural changes, physical limitations, and lack of transportation or other resources. Pixabay

“Achieving and maintaining a healthy diet and engaging in regular physical activity following a TBI are critical goals for recovery,” Dreer added.

In the study, published in Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, 7,287 obese patients with TBI who had undergone inpatient acute rehabilitation, rated themselves as having poorer general health.

Also Read: Abdominal Obesity Linked to Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms

The frequency of seizures — a common problem among TBI survivors — was also related to differences in body weight and health status.

“Lifestyle and health behaviours related to weight gain will need to be a component of any proactive approach to managing TBI as a chronic health condition,” Dreer said. (IANS)

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Obesity Alone Does not Increase Death Risk: Study

Earlier, a study, published in The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology journal, found that women with metabolically healthy obesity were at 39 per cent higher risk of cardiovascular disease

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The researchers looked at how many people within each group died as compared to those within the normal weight population with no metabolic risk factors.
The researchers looked at how many people within each group died as compared to those within the normal weight population with no metabolic risk factors. Pixabay

Patients who have metabolically healthy obesity but are free from other metabolic risk factors do not have an increased rate of mortality, a new study has found.

Metabolically healthy obesity is a debatable medical condition characterized by obesity which does not produce metabolic complications.

The study, published in the journal Clinical Obesity, showed that unlike dyslipidemia, hypertension and diabetes — each one of which is related to high mortality risk — obesity alone does not pose any threat to life.

“We are showing that individuals with metabolically healthy obesity are actually not at an elevated mortality rate,” said lead author Jennifer Kuk, Associate Professor at the York University in Canada.

“We found that a person of normal weight with no other metabolic risk factors is just as likely to die as the person with obesity and no other risk factors,” Kuk added.

Metabolically healthy obesity is a debatable medical condition characterized by obesity which does not produce metabolic complications.
Metabolically healthy obesity is a debatable medical condition characterized by obesity which does not produce metabolic complications. Pixabay

For the study, the research team followed 54,089 men and women from five cohort studies who were categorized as having obesity alone or clustered with a metabolic factor, or elevated glucose, blood pressure or lipids alone or clustered with obesity or another metabolic factor.

The researchers looked at how many people within each group died as compared to those within the normal weight population with no metabolic risk factors.

They found that one out of 20 individuals with obesity had no other metabolic abnormalities.

Also Read: Abdominal Obesity Linked to Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms

“This is in contrast with most of the literature and we think this is because most studies have defined metabolic healthy obesity as having up to one metabolic risk factor,” said Kuk.

“This is clearly problematic, as hypertension alone increases your mortality risk and past literature would have called these patients with obesity and hypertension, ‘healthy’. This is likely why most studies have reported that ‘healthy’ obesity is still related with higher mortality risk,” Kuk noted.

Earlier, a study, published in The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology journal, found that women with metabolically healthy obesity were at 39 per cent higher risk of cardiovascular disease. (IANS)