Tuesday March 19, 2019

Obesity and Overweight Linked to Long-Term Health Problems After Traumatic Brain Injury

The frequency of seizures -- a common problem among TBI survivors -- was also related to differences in body weight and health status

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BMI, Asthma Risk
High BMI in early life is linked to asthma risk later: Study. Pixabay

While obesity has been known to increase the risk of many cardiometabolic diseases in healthy people, it may pose even greater risk for people living with traumatic brain injury (TBI), a study has found.

The study found that for people with moderate to severe TBI, obesity may be associated with long term chronic disease risks including high blood pressure, heart failure, and diabetes.

In TBI patients, weight gain may occur due to a wide range of factors including medical conditions, medications, cognitive or behavioural changes, physical limitations, and lack of transportation or other resources.

“Being obese or overweight presents a health risk in the years following rehabilitation for TBI,” said lead author Laura E. Dreer from The University of Alabama in the US.

weight gain may occur due to a wide range of factors including medical conditions, medications, cognitive or behavioural changes, physical limitations, and lack of transportation or other resources
Weight gain may occur due to a wide range of factors including medical conditions, medications, cognitive or behavioural changes, physical limitations, and lack of transportation or other resources. Pixabay

“Achieving and maintaining a healthy diet and engaging in regular physical activity following a TBI are critical goals for recovery,” Dreer added.

In the study, published in Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, 7,287 obese patients with TBI who had undergone inpatient acute rehabilitation, rated themselves as having poorer general health.

Also Read: Abdominal Obesity Linked to Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms

The frequency of seizures — a common problem among TBI survivors — was also related to differences in body weight and health status.

“Lifestyle and health behaviours related to weight gain will need to be a component of any proactive approach to managing TBI as a chronic health condition,” Dreer said. (IANS)

Next Story

Drinking Green Tea Can Help Reduce Obesity, Inflammation

Drinking green tea has also been linked to a lower risk of cancer, heart and liver disease

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Green tea is the second most consumed beverage.
Green tea is believed to have therapeutic intervention to cure a variety of diseases. Pixabay

Want to cut that extra flab? Drinking green tea can help reduce obesity as well as inflammation in the gut, finds a study.

The findings, published in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, showed that mice fed a high-fat diet supplemented with green tea gained about 20 per cent less weight and had lower insulin resistance than mice fed an otherwise identical diet without tea.

Mice fed a diet of two per cent green tea extract had an improved gut health including more beneficial microbes in the intestines and less permeability in the intestinal wall — a condition called “leaky gut” — than those that ate a diet without it.

Leaky gut is a problem in humans that contributes to widespread low-grade inflammation.

“This study provides evidence that green tea encourages the growth of good gut bacteria, and that leads to a series of benefits that significantly lower the risk of obesity,” said lead author Richard Bruno, Professor at the Ohio State University.

Green tea. Pixabay

For eight weeks, the team fed half of the male mice a high-fat diet that causes obesity and half were fed a regular diet. In each of those groups, half ate green tea extract mixed with their food.

Female mice were not included as they are resistant to diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance.

Green tea also protected against the movement of endotoxin — the toxic bacterial component — out of their guts and into the bloodstream.

Also Read- Jharkhand Government Bans Sale and Usage of E-cigarettes

“Consuming a little throughout the course of a day with food might be better,” Bruno said.

Drinking green tea has also been linked to a lower risk of cancer, heart and liver disease. (IANS)