Saturday November 17, 2018

Obesity Possess Threat of Progressive Disability for Patients of Rheumatoid Arthritis

The researchers found that severe obesity was associated with more rapid progression of disability.

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Overweight means having more body weight than is considered normal or healthy for one's age or build, while obesity is the condition of the excess amount of body fat with a body mass index (BMI) of over 30.
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Obese patients with rheumatoid arthritis are more likely to experience progressive disability than patients who are overweight, according to a new study.

Overweight means having more body weight than is considered normal or healthy for one’s age or build, while obesity is the condition of the excess amount of body fat with a body mass index (BMI) of over 30.

The researchers found that severe obesity was associated with more rapid progression of disability.

Overweight means having more body weight than is considered normal or healthy for one's age or build, while obesity is the condition of the excess amount of body fat with a body mass index (BMI) of over 30.
Representational Image, Pexels

The study, published in the journal Arthritis Care and Research, also found that patients who lost weight tended to become disabled more quickly.

Health providers need to recognize unintentional weight loss as a poor prognostic sign and refer patients for strength training, physical therapy, and other interventions to prevent disability, said the researcher.

“We believe that this is because when people get older and acquire illness, they tend to lose weight,” said Joshua Baker of the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

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“So, this study suggests that patients with rheumatoid arthritis and obesity would benefit from intentional weight loss through a comprehensive management strategy; however, when we see that someone is losing weight without trying, it’s probably a poor prognostic sign, especially if they are already thin,” Baker added.

As new therapies and approaches to weight loss become available, these results will help promote their use in patients with arthritis, to help prevent disability over the long-term, the researcher said.

For the study, the team examined information on 23,323 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. (IANS)

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Genes Tied to Obesity May Lower Risk of Diabetes

"Meanwhile, some lean or normal weight individuals develop diseases like Type-2 diabetes," Yaghootkar noted

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Diabetes
Poor aerobic fitness can up diabetes, heart disease risk in kids. Pixabay

Certain genetic factors may impact our body in intriguingly paradoxical ways. A team of scientists has identified 14 new genetic variations that were linked with higher Body Mass Index (BMI) but have the potential to lower risk of diabetes, lower blood pressure and lower heart disease risk.

According to researchers, it is because the location — around middle or round the liver — where surplus fat is stored could be genetically determined.

This location is more important than the amount when it comes to insulin resistance and risk of diabetes and other conditions.

“There are some genetic factors that increase obesity, but paradoxically reduce metabolic risk. It is to do with where on the body the fat is stored,” said Brunel Alex Blakemore, Professor at the Brunel University London.

The findings revealed that as they gain weight, people who carry these genetic factors store it safely under the skin, and so have less fat in their major organs such as the liver, pancreas and kidneys.

Diabetes
Representational image. Pixabay

“Directly under the skin is better than around the organs or especially, within the liver,” Blakemore added.

For the study, published in the journal Diabetes, the team examined more than 500,000 people aged between 37 and 73.

They used Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans of these people’s waists to match where they stored extra fat with whether they showed signs of Type-2 diabetes, heart attack and risk of stroke.

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“There are many overweight or obese individuals who do not carry the expected metabolic disease risks associated with higher BMI,” explained Hanieh Yaghootkar from the University of Exeter in Britain.

“Meanwhile, some lean or normal weight individuals develop diseases like Type-2 diabetes,” Yaghootkar noted. (IANS)