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Observing anti-corruption day not enough, root out ‘corruption within’

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By Nithin Sridhar

Since 2003, December 9 has been observed annually as the ‘International Anti-Corruption Day’. And, as part of this anti-corruption day, various awareness programs are carried out across the globe.

Corruption is a multi-headed monster. Though, the menace is prevalent across the globe, in many a sense, it has created more troubles in India than at most other places owing to India’s huge population, the majority of whom are middle class or poor.

Corruption in India exists at all levels: Legislative, Executive, and Judiciary. In 2014, India was ranked at 85th position in the global corruption index with a score of 38 by the corruption watchdog Transparency International India (TII). This score was only slightly more than 2013 score of 36.

India has witnessed some of the largest corruption scandals in the world: Coal allocation scam (Cost around Rs 186000 crores), 2G spectrum scam (Rs 176000 crores), Common Wealth Games scam (Rs 70000 crores), and Adarsh Housing scam (Rs 18978 crores).

Then, there is the raging issue of black money. The magnitude of black money stashed abroad has been estimated from a few billion dollars to few trillion dollars. According to the industry body Assocham, around 2 trillion dollars of black money are likely to be stashed overseas. A huge amount of black money is also estimated to be present within India itself.

Corruption, bribery, illegal nexus, money laundering, misuse of power, and nepotism could be observed from the lowest clerical level to highest bureaucracy and judiciary. Be it real estate, construction, multi-nationals, or defense, in every sector one can witness the menace of corruption. Just yesterday, on December 8, Karnataka Lokayukta, Y Bhaskar Rao- the anti-graft ombudsman- was forced to resign after allegations of extortion surfaced.

Corruption has become so much deep-rooted, people have come to accept it as part of a norm. And those who refuse to pay bribes to a government officer or some other private broker end up facing innumerable difficulties due to the obstacles being thrown in their paths.

Internal corruption 

This monster of corruption, with many roots and branches, cannot be rooted out by simply observing an anti-corruption day. No doubt, the observance of such days will go a long way in creating awareness, but such awareness will have a very minimal impact as long as there are no efforts to bring about internal transformation among the people.

Corruption must be countered at all levels, from lowest to highest, but more important is to first root out internal corruption present within the hearts and minds of the people. Unless and until this internal corruption is addressed, no external solution will have lasting value.

The root cause of corruption and nepotism is human desire and greed. Greed is nothing but unrestrained desire. This greed in turn leads a man to become selfish and blind towards his larger role and responsibility towards the society.

Most of the present efforts are concerned only with implementing stringent laws to prevent corruption and creating awareness about problems caused due to corruption. In other words, corruption is being portrayed as a vice and honesty as a virtue. Of course, honesty is a virtue, but it is something more. It is a universal duty and not just an option. The current efforts at removing corruption have been ineffective at bringing any internal transformation simply because, honesty and dishonesty are being portrayed as choices.

On the other hand, the ancient Indic seers who had examined the human nature in all its dimensions had rightly concluded that human greed is a powerful force that drives human actions and such actions, invariably, lead to sorrow and suffering for the person as well as for the society.

Thus, they realized that the only way to cleanse the human heart and mind of this greed is to restrain the desires and regulate the actions. This restraining and regulation of human actions later came to be known as ‘duties’ or obligations. Thus, virtuous actions became ‘duties’ that people were obliged to perform and vice actions became ‘prohibited’ that people were ought to avoid.

This ‘sense’ of honesty as an obligated duty and ‘corruption’ as a prohibited vice is completely missing from the current narrative on corruption. The awareness campaigns and observation of anti-corruption day will not be able to bring in any real and long-term transformation, unless and until a ‘duty’-based narrative is stitched into the current discourse on corruption. Only a sense of duty will ultimately be able to root out corruption from the hearts and minds of the people.

(Photo: frankvogl.wordpress.com)

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India China’s Fight Over the Doklam Plateau Explained

Doklam or Donglang, is a disputed area between China and Bhutan located near their tri-junction with India

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picture from- indiaopines.com

By Ruchika Verma

  • India and China have an old history of disputes
  • This time, the dispute is regarding the Dokplam Plateau
  • The area is of strategic importance for both the nations

Disputes between India and China are not at all uncommon. The rivalry between the two nations is famous. There have been several disputes between the two about the India-China border in past, and there seems to be no stopping for these disputes in the present or future, for that matter.

India and China have a n old history of repeated disputes. zeenews.india.com
India and China have a n old history of repeated disputes. zeenews.india.com

In June 2017, the world witnessed yet another dispute arising between India and China. This time the dispute was about China building a road extending to Doklam Plateau, which both nations have been fighting over for years now.

Also Read : China is likely to get involved if India disrupts $46 billion China-Pakistan Economic Corridor

History of the dispute 

Doklam or Donglang (in Chinese), is a disputed area between China and Bhutan located near their tri-junction with India. India doesn’t directly claim the area but supports Bhutan’s claims on it.

India fits into the picture, as this plateau is an important area for India. Not only is Bhutan one of the biggest allies of India; China gaining access over the Doklam Plateau will also endanger India’s boarders, making them vulnerable to attacks.

Dopkam plateau is an important area near India, China and Bhutan's borders.
Dopkam plateau is an important area near India, China and Bhutan’s borders.

Apart from the hostile history of the two nations, the Doklam Plateau is also important for India to maintain its control over a land corridor that connects to its remote northeastern States. China building a road through Doklam surely threatens that control.

A complete timeline of what happened in the recent Doklam Standoff 

On 16 June 2017, Chinese troops with construction vehicles and excavators began extending an existing road southward on the Doklam plateau, near India’s border. It was Bhutan which raised the alarm for India.

On 18 June 2017, India responded by sending around 270 Indian troops, with weapons and two bulldozers to evict the Chinese troops from Doklam.

On 29 June 2017, Bhutan protested against the construction of a road in the disputed territory.  According to the Bhutanese government, China attempted to extend a road in an area which is shared both Bhutan and India, along with China.

Between 30 June, 2017 and 5 July, 2017, China released multiple statements justifying their claim over the Doklam plateau. They cited reasons  as to why the Doklam standoff wasn’t really needed. And how China has not intruded into India’s territory to incite the standoff.

On 19th July, 2017, China asked India again to withrew its troops from the Doklam. On 24th July, 2017,  Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi, in his statement, asked India to withdraw and behave themselves to maintain peace.

India and China seem to never agree when it comes to their borders. BBC
India and China seem to never agree when it comes to their borders. BBC

Also Read : Why India Must Counter China’s High-Altitude Land Grab ?

What followed till 16th August, 2017 was China constantly alleging India of trying to create trouble. They accused India of trying to disturb the peace and not withdrawing the troops, even after repeated reminders. They also accused India of bullying.

India, however, kept quiet during the whole fiasco, only releasing a statement regarding their stand and position at the Doklam standoff.

On 28 August 2017, India and China finally announced that they had agreed to pull their troops back from the Doklam standoff. The withdrawal was completed on that very day.

On 7 September 2017, many media reports claimed that both nation’s troops have not left the site completely. They were still patrolling the area, simply having moved 150 meters awayfrom their previous position.

On 9 October 2017, China announced that it is ready to maintain peace with India at the frontiers. India reacted in affirmative, the peace was established when Indian Defence Minister, Nirmala Sitharaman’s visited Nathu La.

The issue between the two nations may rise again. Pixabay
The issue between the two nations may rise again. Pixabay

The Doklam issue for now is resolved. However, given the history of disputes between India and China, it won’t be a surprise if the issue resurfaces again in near future.