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Odisha: Six members of a family killed for “practicing witchcraft”

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Bhubaneswar: At least six members of a family, suspected of practicing witchcraft, were hacked to death by villagers in tribal dominated Keonjhar district of Odisha, police said on Monday.

The dead include a woman and four children. While the six family members died on the spot, two others sustained serious injuries and were hospitalised.

In a similar incident, villagers in Rayagada district on Sunday beat a man named Jagabandhu to death and then burnt him for allegedly practicing sorcery and harming them, police said.

In the Keonjhar incident, police said the six members of the family residing in Lahanda village were killed after the villagers suspected them of practicing witchcraft.

“Prima facie, it is found that the six family members have been killed with sharp weapons for practicing sorcery. We have sent the bodies for post mortem. Efforts are on to nab the accused,” said Sub-Divisional Police Officer (SDPO), Badabil Ajay Pratap Swain.

He said a team has reached the spot and begun investigations.

Director General of Police Sanjeev Marik directed the crime branch to supervise the probe into the incident.

Meanwhile, all the men of the village have absconded fearing police action.

(IANS)

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Good education can curb childhood abuse effects: Study

Parent reports and self-reports of the team showed criminal and antisocial behaviour among the childhood abuse victims

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Good education can reduce the impact of childhood abuse. Pixabay
Good education can reduce the impact of childhood abuse. Pixabay
  • A good education may help reduce effects of childhood abuse
  • Abuse which children suffer in young age can make them criminals
  • Poor grades can shift students towards crime too

Good grades and proper schooling may help in protecting victims of childhood abuse from indulging in criminal behaviour in adulthood, a study says.

The emotional and sexual abuse that some kids endure during their childhood can lead them to commit crimes later in life. But when they achieve good grades in childhood and complete their academics, the likelihood of indulging in criminal behaviour declines significantly.

By funding K-12 Public Schools, Qatar Foundation is promoting Arabic in American schools. Pixabay.
Bad education can lead to children moving towards committing crimes. Pixabay.

“Child abuse is a risk factor for later antisocial behaviour,” said Todd Herrenkohl, Professor at the University of Michigan in the US.

“Education and academic achievement can lessen the risk of crime for all youth, including those who have been abused (encountered stress and adversity),” Herrenkohl added.

However, for some children who are weak in academic performance and get suspended in grades seven to nine, the offending habits and antisocial behaviour tends to stay with them even later in life, the researchers said.

Also Read: Strong Relationships May Counter Health Effects of Childhood Abuses

The study, published in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence, noted that the primary prevention of child abuse is a critical first step to reduce antisocial behaviour at the transition from adolescence into adulthood. Researchers followed 356 people from childhood (ages 18 months to 6 years), school-age (8 years), adolescent (18 years) and adulthood (36 years).

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Child abuse can make children criminals. VOA

Parent-child interactions measured various types of abuse and neglect, and responses also factored educational experiences and criminal behaviour against others or property. Parent reports and self-reports of the team showed criminal and antisocial behaviour among the childhood abuse victims.

“Strategies focused on helping school professionals become aware of the impacts of child abuse and neglect are critical to building supportive environments that promote resilience and lessen the risk for antisocial behaviour,” Herrenkohl said. IANS

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