Tuesday November 20, 2018
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Ola Expands its Business, Starts Services in UK

The seven-year-old Ola claims to have 125 million users in 110 cities

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Ola enters UK, rides in South Wales.
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Indian ride-sharing major Ola on Monday forayed into the UK market by launching its services in South Wales, the company said in a statement.

“Ola will offer the customers in South Wales, including in Cardiff, Newport and Vale of Glamorgan, the option of hailing private hire vehicles and taxis on one platform,” the city-based online cab aggregator said in a statement here.

With a plan to expand across the UK by the end of this year, Ola said it has already obtained the licences to operate in Greater Manchester, in northwest England, where it will begin its operations soon.

Over the past few weeks, the company has received positive feedback from the drivers in South Wales, said Ola UK Managing Director Ben Legg.

“We will work with the local authorities in helping the people with their mobility,” Legg said in the statement.

Ola
Founded in 2011, Ola has been competing against Uber in the ride-hailing market. IANS

As part of launching its services in UK, the company is offering limited discount rides to its customers.

Ola’s UK entry comes about seven months after it announced driving into Australia on January 30 to foray into the international market to rival US-based Uber.

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The Bengaluru-based firm is currently operating in seven cities across Australia including Sydney, Perth, Melbourne, Brisbane, Gold Coast and Canberra.

Founded in 2011, Ola has been competing against Uber in the ride-hailing market.

The seven-year-old Ola claims to have 125 million users in 110 cities. (IANS)

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Here’s How Facebook Identifies ‘Inauthentic Behaviour’

To ensure that we stay ahead, we’ve invested heavily in better technology and more people.

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Fake News, Facebook, dating
This photo shows the logo for Facebook on screens at the Nasdaq MarketSite, in New York's Times Square. VOA

Facebook announced Friday that it had removed 82 Iranian-linked accounts on Facebook and Instagram. A Facebook spokesperson answered VOA’s questions about its process and efforts to detect what it calls “coordinated inauthentic behavior” by accounts pretending to be U.S. and U.K. citizens and aimed at U.S. and U.K. audiences.

Q: Facebook’s post says there were 7 “events hosted.” Any details about where, when, who?

A: Of seven events, the first was scheduled for February 2016, and the most recent was scheduled for June 2018. One hundred and ten people expressed interest in at least one of these events, and two events received no interest. We cannot confirm whether any of these events actually occurred. Some appear to have been planned to occur only online. The themes are similar to the rest of the activity we have described.

Q: Is there any indication this was an Iranian government-linked program?

A: We recently discussed the challenges involved with determining who is behind information operations. In this case, we have not been able to determine any links to the Iranian government, but we are continuing to investigate. Also, Atlantic Council’s Digital Forensic Research Lab has shared their take on the content in this case here.

facebook
Iranians surf the internet at a cafe in Tehran, Iran, Sept, 17, 2013. In Iran, a government push for a ‘halal’ internet means more control after protests.. VOA

Q: How long was the time between discovering this and taking down the pages?

A: We first detected this activity one week ago. As soon as we detected this activity, the teams in our elections war room worked quickly to investigate and remove these bad actors. Given the elections, we took action as soon as we’d completed our initial investigation and shared the information with U.S. and U.K. government officials, U.S. law enforcement, Congress, other technology companies and the Atlantic Council’s Digital Forensic Research Lab.

Q: How have you improved the reporting processes in the past year to speed the ability to remove such content?

A: Just to clarify, today’s takedown was a result of our teams proactively discovering suspicious signals on a page that appeared to be run by Iranian users. From there, we investigated and found the set of pages, groups and accounts that we removed today.

To your broader question on how we’ve improved over the past two years: To ensure that we stay ahead, we’ve invested heavily in better technology and more people. There are now over 20,000 people working on safety and security at Facebook, and thanks to improvements in artificial intelligence we detect many fake accounts, the root cause of so many issues, before they are even created. We’re also working more closely with governments, law enforcement, security experts and other companies because no one organization can do this on its own.

Facebook, Child nudity
This photo shows a Facebook app icon on a smartphone in New York. VOA

Q: How many people do you have monitoring content in English now? In Persian?

A: We have over 7,500 content reviewers globally. We don’t provide breakdowns of the number of people working in specific languages or regions because that alone doesn’t reflect the number of people working to review content for a particular country or region at any particular time.

Q: How are you training people to spot this content? What’s the process?

A: To be clear, today’s takedown was the result of an internal investigation involving a combination of manual work by our teams of skilled investigators and data science teams using automated tools to look for larger patterns to identify potentially inauthentic behavior. In this case, we relied on both of these techniques working together.

Also Read: Social Media Advertising in 2019: Staying Ahead of The Curve

On your separate question about training content reviewers, here is more on our content reviewers and how we support them.

Q: Does Facebook have any more information on how effective this messaging is at influencing behavior?

A: We aren’t in a position to know. (VOA)