Tuesday January 21, 2020

Omega-3 Could Help Kids Reduce Disruptive Behavior: Study

Findings suggest that improving child behaviour through omega-3 supplementation could have long-term benefits to the family system as a whole

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Tuna
It was paid by Kiyomura Corp., whose owner Kiyoshi Kimura runs the Sushi Zanmai chain. Kimura has often won the annual auction in the past. Pixabay

Consuming omega-3 fatty acid supplements can potentially reduce disruptive and even abusive behaviour in kids, researchers have found.

Improving child behaviour could also lead to improvements in parent behaviour. However no study has examined whether omega-3 supplementation in children could reduce intimate partner violence or child maltreatment by their adult caregivers, the researchers said.

“This is a promising line of research because omega-3 fatty acids are thought to improve brain health in children and adults,” said Jill Portnoy, Assistant Professor in the University of Massachusetts – Lowell, US.

“There is more to be learned about the benefits, but if we can improve people’s brain health, and behaviour in the process, that’s a really big plus,” Portnoy added.

The research is an example of how biological and social factors can help explain and predict impulsive and risky behaviour in children, he said.

Omega-3
Caregivers of children in the omega-3 group reported long-term reductions in psychological aggression. Pixabay

For the study, published in the journal Aggressive Behavior, a group of 200 children were randomized to receive either a fruit drink containing 1 gm of omega-3 fats and a placebo group drank the same fruit drink without omega-3.

Caregivers of children in the omega-3 group reported long-term reductions in psychological aggression.

Improvements in adult psychological aggression were correlated with improvements in child externalizing behaviour scores.

No differences were reported for child maltreatment.

Also Read: Omega-3 Supplements do not Protect Against Heart Disease: Study

“This study is the first to show that omega-3 supplementation in children can reduce inter-partner psychological aggression among adult caregivers not receiving supplements,” the researchers said.

“Findings suggest that improving child behaviour through omega-3 supplementation could have long-term benefits to the family system as a whole,” they noted. (IANS)

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71% Parents Feel That Video Games May Have Positive Impact on Kids

71% parents believe video games good for teens

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Video Games
86 per cent of parents agree that teeagers spend too much time on video games. Pixabay

Seventy-one per cent of parents believe that video games may have a positive and healthy impact on their kids’ lifestyle, while 44 per cent try to restrict video game content, says a new study.

According to the CS Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll on Children’s Health in US, 86 per cent of parents agree that teeagersspend too much time gaming. Parents also reported very different gaming patterns for teenage boys than girls.

Twice as many parents said that their teen boy plays video games every day compared to parents of teen girls. Teen boys are also more likely to spend three or more hours gaming.

“Although many parents believe video games can be good for teens, they also report a number of negative impacts of prolonged gaming,” said poll co-director Gary Freed from University of Michigan.

Video Games
Parents can play an important role by setting clear rules about appropriate content and how much time is too much time spent on video games. Pixabay

“Parents should take a close look at their teen’s gaming behaviour and set reasonable limits to reduce harmful impacts on sleep, family and peer relationships and school performance,” Freed added.

Overall, parents surveyed said that gaming often gets in the way of other aspects of their teen’s life, such as family activities and interactions (46 per cent), sleep (44 per cent), homework (34 per cent), friendship with non-gaming peers (33 per cent) and extracurricular activities (31 per cent).

Parents of teens ages 13-15 (compared to those with older teens) are more likely to use rating systems to try to make sure games are appropriate (43 per cent versus 18 per cent), encourage their teen to play with friends in person rather than online and to ban gaming in their teen’s bedroom.

Parents polled also use different strategies to limit the amount of time their teen spends gaming, including encouraging other activities (75 per cent), setting time limits (54 per cent), providing incentives to limit gaming (23 per cent) and hiding gaming equipment (14 percent).

The researchers noted that while gaming may be a fun activity in moderation, some teens -such as those with attention issues — are especially susceptible to the constant positive feedback and the stimulus of video games.

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This may lead to prolonged play that is disruptive to other elements of a teen’s life, the researchers added.

“Parents can play an important role by setting clear rules about appropriate content and how much time is too much time spent on video games,” Freed said. (IANS)