Wednesday March 27, 2019

Omega-3 Could Help Kids Reduce Disruptive Behavior: Study

Findings suggest that improving child behaviour through omega-3 supplementation could have long-term benefits to the family system as a whole

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It was paid by Kiyomura Corp., whose owner Kiyoshi Kimura runs the Sushi Zanmai chain. Kimura has often won the annual auction in the past. Pixabay

Consuming omega-3 fatty acid supplements can potentially reduce disruptive and even abusive behaviour in kids, researchers have found.

Improving child behaviour could also lead to improvements in parent behaviour. However no study has examined whether omega-3 supplementation in children could reduce intimate partner violence or child maltreatment by their adult caregivers, the researchers said.

“This is a promising line of research because omega-3 fatty acids are thought to improve brain health in children and adults,” said Jill Portnoy, Assistant Professor in the University of Massachusetts – Lowell, US.

“There is more to be learned about the benefits, but if we can improve people’s brain health, and behaviour in the process, that’s a really big plus,” Portnoy added.

The research is an example of how biological and social factors can help explain and predict impulsive and risky behaviour in children, he said.

Omega-3
Caregivers of children in the omega-3 group reported long-term reductions in psychological aggression. Pixabay

For the study, published in the journal Aggressive Behavior, a group of 200 children were randomized to receive either a fruit drink containing 1 gm of omega-3 fats and a placebo group drank the same fruit drink without omega-3.

Caregivers of children in the omega-3 group reported long-term reductions in psychological aggression.

Improvements in adult psychological aggression were correlated with improvements in child externalizing behaviour scores.

No differences were reported for child maltreatment.

Also Read: Omega-3 Supplements do not Protect Against Heart Disease: Study

“This study is the first to show that omega-3 supplementation in children can reduce inter-partner psychological aggression among adult caregivers not receiving supplements,” the researchers said.

“Findings suggest that improving child behaviour through omega-3 supplementation could have long-term benefits to the family system as a whole,” they noted. (IANS)

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Nose of Kids Hold Clues to Serious Lung Infections

Experts say this breaks with traditional thinking that symptoms predict whether either a virus or bacteria is causing the illness and could impact a decision of whether or not to use antibiotics

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People pass by an installation of an artificial model of lungs to illustrate the effect of air pollution outside a hospital in New Delhi, India, Nov. 5, 2018.

Tiny organisms in a child’s nose could offer clues to improving the diagnosis and treatment of severe lung infections, a new study suggests.

The study found that the composition of the microbiome — bacteria and viruses found in vast numbers in the body — was altered in the noses of children with respiratory infections, compared with his healthy peers.

This difference predicted how much time children had to spend in hospital and helped spot those likely to recover naturally, potentially reducing the need for antibiotics, said researchers from the University of Edinburgh.

“Our findings show, for the first time, the total microbial community in the respiratory tract — rather than a single virus or a bacteria — is a vital indicator of respiratory health. This could impact how doctors diagnose LRTIs and use precious antibiotics to fight infections,” said lead author Debby Bogaert, Professor at the varsity.

Lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs), including pneumonia and bronchiolitis, are a leading cause of death. Symptoms include, shortness of breath, weakness and fever.

Coal Miners
Former coal miner Wade Pauley, who has Black Lung disease after working 33 years underground in mines, stands for a chest x-ray at United Medical Services in Pikeville, Kentucky, U.S., May 22, 2018. (VOA)

It was found that the microbiome in the back of the nose and throat was related to that seen in the lungs, making it easier to understand and diagnose infections.

For the study, published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine, the researchers studied more than 150 children under the age of six, hospitalised with LRTI. They compared them with 300 healthy children.

Children with LRTI had a different microbiome profile — including the types and amounts of individual viral and bacterial organisms — compared with the healthy children.

Also Read- Inactive Ingredients in Medicines May Cause Allergy: Study

These profiles could identify 92 per cent of children as being healthy or ill when combined with factors like the child’s age. This was true no matter what symptoms the child had.

Experts say this breaks with traditional thinking that symptoms predict whether either a virus or bacteria is causing the illness and could impact a decision of whether or not to use antibiotics. (IANS)