Friday July 20, 2018

One person dies every six seconds due to Tobacco: W.H.O.

Among smokers who are aware of the dangers of tobacco, most want to quit. Counseling and medication can more than double the chance that a smoker who tries to quit will succeed.

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One person dies every six seconds due to tobacco: World Health Organization
One person dies every six seconds due to tobacco: World Health Organization
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One person dies every six seconds due to tobacco: World Health Organization
Tobacco is a major killer worldwide. Smoking nicotine is linked to many diseases including cancers.

Tobacco Kills:An undisputed fact

Tobacco smoking has become a major single cause of cancer mortality [death] around the world.

According to a report by WHO, the tobacco epidemic is one of the biggest public health threats the world has ever faced, which kills nearly six million people a year. More than five million of those deaths are the result of direct tobacco use while more than 600,000 are the result of non-smokers being exposed to second-hand smoke.

Approximately one person dies every six seconds due to tobacco, accounting for one in 10 adult deaths. Up to half of current users will eventually die of a tobacco-related disease.

The report says, “Tobacco caused 100 million deaths in the 20th century. If current trends continue, it may cause one billion deaths in the 21st century.”

Unchecked, tobacco-related deaths will increase to more than eight million per year by 2030. More than 80% of those deaths will be in low-and middle-income countries, the report suggests.

However, despite the menace caused by tobacco consumption, only four countries, representing just over a third of the world’s population, monitor tobacco use by repeating nationally representative youth and adult surveys at least once every five years.

As per the report, studies show that few people understand the specific health risks of tobacco use. For example, a 2009 survey in China revealed that only 38% of smokers knew that smoking causes coronary heart disease and only 27% knew that it causes stroke.

Among smokers who are aware of the dangers of tobacco, most want to quit. Counseling and medication can more than double the chance that a smoker who tries to quit will succeed.

National comprehensive cessation services with full or partial cost-coverage are available to assist tobacco users to quit in only 21 countries, representing 15% of the world’s population.

-Prepared by NewsGram staff writer.

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Meditation Improves Mood, Sleep in Teenagers with Cancer

The mindfulness-based interventions for teenagers with cancer appear as a promising option to lighten psychological inconveniences of living with cancer

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The process focuses on the present moment and the connection between the mind and body. Pixabay

Daily meditation can help improve mood and sleep in teenagers suffering or recuperating from cancer, a promising research shows.

Mindfulness-based meditation could lessen some symptoms associated with cancer in teenagers, according to the results of a clinical trial intervention led by researchers at University of Montreal and its affiliated CHU Sainte-Justine children’s hospital.

The process focuses on the present moment and the connection between the mind and body.

Adolescents living with cancer face not only the physical symptoms of their condition but also the anxiety and uncertainty related to the progression of the disease and the anticipation of physical and emotional pain related to illness and treatment.

meditation
Daily meditation can help improve mood and sleep in teenagers suffering or recuperating from cancer. Pixabay

The researchers asked 13 adolescents with cancer to complete questionnaires covering mood (positive and negative emotions, anxiety and depression), sleep and quality of life.
The group was divided in two. The first group of eight adolescents were offered eight mindfulness-based meditation sessions and the remaining five adolescents in the control group were put on a wait-list.

After the last meditation session, patients from both groups filled out the same questionnaires a second time.

Also Read: Daily Meditation may keep you attentive in old age

“We found that teenagers that participated in the mindfulness group had lower scores in depression after our eight sessions. Girls from the mindfulness group reported sleeping better. We also noticed that they developed mindfulness skills to a greater extent than boys during the sessions,” explained Catherine Malboeuf-Hurtubise from University of Montreal.

The mindfulness-based interventions for teenagers with cancer appear as a promising option to lighten psychological inconveniences of living with cancer, she added. (IANS)