Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×
Online images of men and women in four professions - librarian, nurse, computer programmer and civil engineer - tend to represent and reinforce existing gender stereotypes. Pixabay

Gender bias and stereotypes corresponding to certain occupations are prevalent on digital and social media platforms such as Twitter, says a study.

Online images of men and women in four professions – librarian, nurse, computer programmer and civil engineer – tend to represent and reinforce existing gender stereotypes, said the study published in the Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology.


Women were overrepresented as librarians and nurses and underrepresented as computer programmers and civil engineers, especially when the collection and curation of content is largely automated by an algorithm, such as on Twitter, showed the findings.

For the study, the researchers from Rutgers University in New Jersey, US, analysed search results for images of people in each of the four occupations on four digital media platforms: Twitter, NYTimes.com, Wikipedia and Shutterstock.


Gender bias limits the ability of people to select careers that may suit them and impedes fair practices, pay equity and equality. Pixabay

They also compared the search results to the gender representation of each occupation as per the US Bureau of Labour Statistics.

“Gender bias limits the ability of people to select careers that may suit them and impedes fair practices, pay equity and equality,” said study co-author Mary Chayko, a sociologist at the School of Communication and Information.

“Understanding the prevalence and patterns of bias and stereotypes in online images is essential, and can help us challenge, and hopefully someday break, these stereotypes,” Chayko added.

On platforms where individuals can generate and curate content more directly, such as the NYTimes.com and Shutterstock, stereotypes were more likely to be challenged, the findings showed.

Search results of NYTimes.com, for example, produced images of civil engineers who are women, and nurses who are men, more often than would be expected given their representation in the Labour Statistics.

“More direct content curation will help counter gender stereotypes,” said Vivek Singh, Assistant Professor in Rutgers’ School of Communication and Information.

While women generally tend to be underrepresented in male-dominated professions on digital media platforms, Singh noted some progress toward equity in the gendered presentation of images from 2018 to 2019.

Also Read- Here’s why Indians Order-in Food

For instance, more women were shown in images for male-dominated professions on Twitter in 2019 than in 2018.

The researchers said that the study could help prevent biases from being designed into digital media platforms, algorithms and artificial intelligence software. (IANS)


Popular

Unsplash

For the first time in independent India, now a postgraduate course in Hindu Dharma is included at the Benares Hindu University.

By Maria Wirth

Things are finally changing for the better for Hindu Dharma. For too long, many educated Indians, including the first Prime Minister Jawahar Nehru, had accepted the biased view of the British that Hinduism is inferior to the Abrahamic religions, without realizing, that this was a clever strategy to hide the fact that Christianity and Islam are based on a ‘must-belief’ story and Hinduism in contrast, is based on verifiable insights of the Vedas and a genuine enquiry into the truth.

For the first time in independent India, now a postgraduate course in Hindu Dharma is included at the Benares Hindu University. It reminded me that already almost one year ago, a centre to study the practice and philosophy of Nath Panth was established at Deen Dayal Upadhyaya Gorakhpur University by Yogi Adityanath, who himself is a Nath Yogi and the Mahant of Gorakhpur Mutt, apart from being the Chief Minister of Uttar Pradesh. A conference was held in March 2021, to which I contributed the following thoughts:

Keep Reading Show less
IANS

According to the family, the boy went missing in 2012.

He was 18 years old when he went missing from his home in the Mahmadpur village in Farrukhabad district. Brajpal returned to his house on Friday after more than ten years and his overjoyed parents could not believe their eyes. But a rival family informed the police as Brajpal's family had filed a kidnapping case against them. The police soon came and took away Brajpal for questioning.

According to the family, the boy went missing in 2012. His parents looked for him for nearly two years, and later approached the local police. It was when the local police allegedly refused to register their FIR, they went to the court and got an FIR registered at the Merapur police station against their neighbours, accusing them of kidnapping their son, following a land dispute.

missing signage Brajpal returned to his house on Friday after more than ten years | Unsplash

Keep Reading Show less
IANS

The weird passion for the rejects came out of a dire need, to secure admission to the prestigious NID, Ahmedabad.

By Quaid Najmi

Junking an empty chips packet, a water bottle or a juice can make Haribaabu Naatesan scowl and perhaps even pick it up carefully -- for, it could be a future piece of 'artwork' in his creative mind. The Mumbai-based artist specialises in recycling all kinds of 'kabaad' (junk) -- organic, inorganic, metal, wood, plastic, e-wastes and even bird feathers -- to create some eye-popping masterpieces of artworks, stupefying the beholder.

Naatesan, 46, collects a staggering 6 tonnes -- or 500 kgs per month -- of all types of oddments as his cheap or virtually free raw material and then deploys his creative juices to convert them to treasured and coveted showpieces. The weird passion for the rejects came out of a dire need -- to secure admission to the prestigious NID, Ahmedabad, for a postgraduate course (2000 batch).

"I had no money for purchasing expensive raw materials to make an attractive art project, a prerequisite for the NID seat... So I just picked up some trash lying around, created a daddy long-legs (spider) and other creatures as my 'offering' for admission," chuckled Naatesan. Needless to say, the selectors were zapped - and 'wasted' no time in awarding a prized seat to the new-found genius on the campus - who promised to be a valuable future asset for 'Save the Planet' efforts.

Naatesan, 46, collects a staggering 6 tonnes -- or 500 kgs per month. | IANS

Keep reading... Show less