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Online Restautant Aggregators Must Create a Netflix for Food

Hosted by Uber Eats, the two-day “APAC Future of Food” summit is aimed at finding the balance between technology and human hospitality

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Netflix.

As online food delivering platforms gain popularity and virtual kitchens set new goals, consumers globally want personalised experiences and to connect emotionally with the brands, a top Uber Eats executive stressed here on Tuesday.

Addressing the APAC ‘Future of Food Summit’ here, Nikki Neuburger who is Global Marketing Head at Uber Eats, said people are making food orders more interactive with comments and feedback.

“To transform the moments of tension into moments of meaningful connections, people want to be more involved. They seek information like who has prepared the food, who is delivering it and who is reviewing it,” Neuburger told the gathering.

Making food orders more personalised is part of the idea behind why consumers wish their food orders to be treated with a human touch.

In order to cater to their demands, brands like Uber Eats are implementing technologies like Artificial Intelligence (AI), Machine Learning (ML), data analytics and Augmented Reality (AR) in their apps and services.

Swiggy, uber eats, food app
Delivery men working with the food delivery apps Uber Eats and Swiggy wait to pick up an order outside a restaurant in Mumbai, India, Feb. 6, 2019. VOA

“The future of online food services is similar to that of hiring a private chef — to know a detailed personal understanding of an individual’s food choices based on their order history,” said Stephen Chau, Senior Director and Global Head of product, Uber Eats.

According to Chau, the time has come for the online restaurant aggregators to create more customised and personalised services for users — like Netflix for food.

Also Read: Google Kills Nest App for Android, Apple Watches

According to experts, data-driven food is taking over the world with technologies like AI undertaking the responsibility of maintaining the integrity of food — from nutrition to agriculture.

Hosted by Uber Eats, the two-day “APAC Future of Food” summit is aimed at finding the balance between technology and human hospitality. (IANS)

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Customer’s Find Foods in Today’s Marketplace Too Sweet

Sweet was the most frequently mentioned taste quality and the reviewers told us that human food is over-sweetened

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Customers, Food, Sweet
This is the first study of this scale to study food choice beyond the artificial constraints of the laboratory. Pixabay

Customers find foods in today’s marketplace to be too sweet, researchers that analysed nearly four lakh food reviews said.

“This is the first study of this scale to study food choice beyond the artificial constraints of the laboratory. Sweet was the most frequently mentioned taste quality and the reviewers told us that human food is over-sweetened,” said study lead author Danielle Reed from Monell Chemical Senses Center in the US.

Published in the journal of Physiology and Behavior, the study examined 393,568 unique food reviews of 67,553 products posted by 256,043 customers over a 10 year period to gain real-world insight into the food choices that people make.

To identify words related to taste, texture, odour, spiciness, cost, health and customer service, the researchers used statistical modelling programme and computed the number of reviews that mentioned each of these categories.

Customers, Food, Sweet
Customers find foods in today’s marketplace to be too sweet, researchers that analysed nearly four lakh food reviews said. Pixabay

The focus on product over-sweetness was striking as almost one per cent of product reviews, regardless of food type, used the phrase “too sweet”.

When looking at reviews that referred to sweet taste, the researchers found that over-sweetness was mentioned 25 times more than under-sweetness.

The researchers found that sweet taste was mentioned in 11 per cent of product reviews, almost three times more often than bitter. (IANS)