Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×
Total online video users count rose to 294 million in December 2019. Pixabay

Number of online video users in smaller towns grew 40 per cent last year against 25 per cent growth in urban India over the last one year, a new report said on Thursday.

Total online video users count rose to 294 million in December 2019, according to the ICUBE report by Kantar, a data, insights and consulting company.


The results suggest that online video consumption is driving Internet adoption in smaller towns – with a population below five lakh.

Music and movies are the two most-watched online video content in urban India, the data showed.

Follow NewsGram on Instagram to keep yourself updated.

“The one line verdict on digital entertainment for the year is that of uninterrupted growth. There is good news, for both platforms and marketers,” Biswapriya Bhattacharjee, Executive Vice President, Insights Division, Kantar, said in a statement.

“The digital medium is way younger than its offline counterparts but we already see a very discerning audience base. The concept of specialisation is already in place and the platform allows the content creators to bring out their creative best on this platform.”


The growth of online video users in urban India is highest among 45 and above years age group. Pixabay

Contrary to the popular myth, online video consumption is no longer a young people phenomenon.

The growth of online video users in urban India is highest among 45 and above years age group, the data showed.

Not only the number of people watching videos has witnessed a surge, but they are doing it on a more frequent basis as the results showed that 65 per cent of online video watchers consume video online daily.

The proportion of 45 and above years age group people watching online video is higher among smaller cities than metros and large cities.

The proportion of female online video viewers is higher than males among the less than 15 years old age group, said the study.


The proportion of female online video viewers is higher than males. Pixabay

With affordable Internet and a wide range of curated content, the on-demand video has seen significant growth over the last one year.

Also Read: Depression, Anxiety Higher in Adults During Covid-19 Peak

While subscription video on demand (SVOD) content has witnessed a significant surge over the last one year with users growing to the tune of 82 per cent over the last one year, advertising-based video on demand (AVOD) has also marked 29 per cent growth in users.

The growth of social media video users has been slower compared to AVOD or SVOD growth rate.

There is an increase in the number of social media video viewers by 18 per cent, said the report, adding that the proportion of video users accessing social media video has dropped over the last one year. (IANS)


Popular

Wikimedia commons

A Tamil couple after their wedding

South India is renowned for many things that elicit culture and tradition. One of the things normally associated with this intricate and impenetrably tradition-bound group of people is their immense love for gold. Their temples, sarees, utensils, and sometimes even food are coated in gold. Their jewellery, while stunning, often bears social implications within their own family hierarchies. One of these traditions is upheld even during Deepavali.

A practice followed usually in wealthy households, Thalai Deepavali is the first Deepavali celebrated after the daughter of the house is married off. During her wedding, the father of the bride would have put up a spectacle, no doubt, but on this occasion as well, he has to host his son-in-law with all the splendour he can afford.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Devang Punia on Unsplash

On Diwali, people put on new clothing and proceed to temples, where they buy large quantities of sweets to distribute to friends and family.

Deepavali or Diwali is the name given to the Festival of Lights (deep-lamp, vali - array) and is celebrated by Hindus, Jains, Sikhs, and certain Buddhists. The celebration lasts five days and is held during the Hindu lunisolar month of Kartika. Diwali represents the spiritual winning of light over darkness, good over evil and knowledge over ignorance.

During Diwali, people dress in their best clothes, decorate their homes with diyas and rangoli, hold worship ceremonies for Lakshmi, the goddess of prosperity and wealth, light fireworks, and gather with their families for family feasts during which sweets and gifts are exchanged.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Martin de Arriba on Unsplash

Diwali is known for gifting and jewellery tops the list, with the focus on buying gold and diamonds.

Diwali is known for gifting and jewellery tops the list, with the focus on buying gold and diamonds. ORRA jewellery, a trusted diamond jewellery brand is gearing up for the festive and bridal season. As they open their 50th store in the country, IANSlife caught up with Dipu Mehta, Managing Director, ORRA, to find out how the company plans to ramp up its now 50 company-owned and operated stores, expanding its retail presence in Tier-1 and 2 cities and target the millennial segment.

Read Excerpts:

Q: The brand is expanding in tier-2 and tier-3 cities, is brick and mortar the way forward to create a presence in this segment?

A: ORRA currently is expanding in metros plus tier-2 cities. But we aren't opening stores in any new markets. We are only opening in markets where we are already present. We are increasing the number of stores within cities as the demand for jewellery buying has also increased. Currently, we are present in 25 cities with 50 stores, and by the end of the month, we would be launching another seven stores.
Also with a category like jewellery, it is important to have brick and mortar stores as the customers like to see and hold higher value jewellery before purchasing. Jewellery buying is an important decision to the customers and having a store gives them that assurance.

ORRA logo ORRA currently is expanding in metros plus tier-2 cities. | Wikimedia Commons

Keep reading... Show less