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Survey Shows That Only 2 Per Cent Women Play Lead Roles in Tech Teams

For the survey, HackerEarth surveyed over 1000 women from 35 countries holding technology positions in various organisations

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More evidence that most men have NO IDEA how women think
Only 2 per cent women promoted to lead tech teams: Survey. pixabay

Despite an increase in the number of women excelling in the tech world, women still remain highly underrepresented with just 2 per cent being promoted to leadership roles, a survey revealed on Monday.

The survey titled “Women in Technology 2018: Breaking Gender Barriers” conducted by HackerEarth, an innovation management and talent assessment company, explored the state of women technologists across the globe and the challenges faced by them in the workplace.

It shows that only one-third of all tech teams comprised of women, demonstrating a stark disparity in the number of women employed by tech organisations.

Despite 86 per cent of the study respondents having a formal degree in computer science, most experienced a stagger in their career growth, and only 2 per cent could make it to the top roles.

“While the number of women graduating in CS has been on a steady rise, when it comes to career growth, the numbers are staggeringly low,” Vivek Prakash, CTO and Co-Founder, HackerEarth, said in a statement.

iPad Neck Pain More Common Among Women Than MeniPad Neck Pain More Common Among Women Than Men
Representational image. Pixabay

“Implementing policies to support women in the workplace and providing them with training and resources will help reduce the high attrition rates we have observed amongst women technologists,” Prakash added.

In a bid to seek work with emerging technologies, flexibility as well as better pay, more than 50 per cent women developers were found to move to a new job.

Importantly, 50 per cent of the women technologists believed that “gendered wordings” in job adverts discouraged them from applying for technical positions.

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Solutions such as blind recruitments, building family-oriented policies, and upskilling opportunities will help women excel in their careers and reduce gender disparity in every organisation, the survey suggested.

For the survey, HackerEarth surveyed over 1000 women from 35 countries holding technology positions in various organisations. (IANS)

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Light Physical Activity May Lower CVD Risk in Women: Study

Most people do not think of folding clothes or walking to the mailbox as physical activity of any kind

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Mental Health
Cycling, walking in nature may improve your mental health. Pixabay

While strolling or running are beneficial for heart health, light physical activity, such as gardening and folding clothes, may also lower the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in older women, say researchers.

The study showed that such activities might be enough to significantly reduce stroke or heart failure by up to 22 per cent and the risk of heart attack or coronary death by as much as 42 per cent.

The association was strong across all racial and ethnic groups, noted the study published in the journal JAMA Network Open.

“The higher the amount of activity, the lower the risk,” said co-author Andrea LaCroix, Researcher at the University of California, San Diego.

Walking
Walk your way to good health.

“And the risk reduction showed regardless of the women’s overall health status, functional ability or even age. In other words, the association with light physical activity was apparent regardless of these other factors,” LaCroix added.

For the study, researchers studied nearly 6,000 women aged 63 to 97. They were made to wear a device which measured their movement 24 hours a day for seven consecutive days. The device was also calibrated by age to distinguish between light, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity.

Also Read- Vitamin B in Pregnancy Prevents Brain Ailments in Baby

Most people do not think of folding clothes or walking to the mailbox as physical activity of any kind, the researchers said.

“This study suggests that for older women, any and all movement counts towards better cardiovascular health,” said David Goff, Director at National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) in the US. (IANS)