Saturday November 17, 2018

Only these 7 pasta brands have been given green chit by FSSAI after Maggi mess

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New Delhi: Instant noodles and pastas with taste-makers of only seven companies are allowed to be sold in India, the food safety watchdog said on Monday, while also ordering tests on all approved variants and calling for the remaining “illegal” ones to be destroyed.

The seven companies that have approvals for their variants of instant noodles and pastas with taste-makers are:

FSSAI Approved Pastas & Noodles Companies Are:

  • Ruchi International (Koka)
  • CG Foods (Wai Wai)
  • Glaxosmithkline (Foodles)
  • Nestle (Maggi)
  • AA Nutrition (Yummy)
  • Indo Nisin (Top Ramen)
  • ITC (brand not specified)

“The safety of all other products in these categories has not been assessed as per the product approval procedures. As such, the same are unauthorized and illegal and cannot be intended for human consumption,” said a letter from the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI).

Ordering tests on all the approved varieties, the letter written by chief executive Yudhvir Singh Malik to all the commissioners of food safety said that as far as all the remaining food products are concerned, they are advised to “ensure such products are recalled, removed from the market and destroyed.”

Speaking to IANS, the top food safety officer said tests on Nestle’s Maggi and some other similar products had raised serious health concerns and thus it was thought fit to conduct tests on all similar products for which approvals had been granted.

Following tests on some samples of Maggi, the watchdog on Friday had ordered the recall of all the nine variants of Maggi pan-India, and had asked Nestle to halt its production and exports. It had also issued a similar order on Nestle’s oats noodles and taste-maker.

While Nestle continues to contend that its noodles were safe for humans and that the levels of lead were within permissible limits – as opposed to the findings of some tests that purportedly indicated otherwise, several states also became pro-active by issuing their own ban orders.

“Overseas and local manufacturers would be treated equally. More noodle brands including pasta and macaroni products will also start getting tested this week,” Malik said.

On being asked if the brand ambassadors could be taken to task, he said: “As of now, we are not considering any action.”

The regulator also detailed the process involved in the recall of food products.

“Ideally, consumers should be able to return the product at the retail outlet and get their money back if they have the bill with them. It is also Nestle’s responsibility to let the consumers return their products, if they have kept the bill with them,” he said.

The regulator also plans to post a list of all approved noodle products on its web site and advise the state authorities to test them. “We understand Delhi, Gujarat and Tamil Nadu have already started testing other brands. We will list all the approved noodle products soon.”

He further said that Nestle had been asked to give the regulator an update on compliance first after three days and then regularly until the end. “Because we understand that it could take 10 days or more, we will be taking regular progress reports from the company,” Malik said.

-IANS

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Lack of Proper Sanitation Affects 620 Million Children Around The World: Report

Despite the improvements, more than a third of the girls in South Asia miss school for one to three days a month during their period.

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A new toilet recently installed in a Rohingya refugee camp in Bangladesh. VOA

A lack of proper school toilets threatens the health, education and safety of at least 620 million children around the world, the charity WaterAid said in a new study published Friday.

Children at 1 in 3 schools lack access to proper toilets, putting them at risk of diarrhea and other infections and forcing some to miss lessons altogether, according to the study, based on data from 101 countries.

Guinea-Bissau in West Africa has the worst school toilets while Ethiopian children fare worst at home, with 93 percent of homes lacking a decent toilet according to the report, released ahead of World Toilet Day on Monday.

toilets, students
Students arrive for class at the Every Nation Academy private school in the city of Makeni in Sierra Leone, April 20, 2012. VOA

“The message here is that water and sanitation affect everything,” WaterAid spokeswoman Anna France-Williams told the Thomson Reuters Foundation. “If there’s no toilet in schools, children will miss lessons and it will have an impact on their growing up.”

Diarrhea, infection risk

A lack of proper sanitation puts millions of children around the world in danger of diarrhea, which kills 289,000 children younger than 5 a year, WaterAid said.

But some regions have started to clean up their act, notably South Asia, where access to toilets in schools has improved.

More than half the schools in Bangladesh now have access to decent toilets, while students in 73 percent of schools in India and 76 percent of those in Bhutan can access basic sanitation.

Akramul Islam, director of water, sanitation and hygiene at the Bangladeshi charity BRAC, said the country’s once-high levels of open defecation — using open ground rather than toilets — were now less than 1 percent.

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India’s plight in sanitation has not improved much since ages.
Pixabay

“Today, schools have separate toilets for girls and boys and the issue of menstrual hygiene is also being addressed,” he said. “This has happened because of initiatives taken by both the government, the NGOs and other stakeholders.”

Also Read: 3 HIV+ Students Banned From School in Indonesia

Improvement needed

Despite the improvements, more than a third of the girls in South Asia miss school for one to three days a month during their period, WaterAid said, urging greater investment in basic sanitation.

“If we are serious about all children and young people, wherever they are, whatever their gender, physical ability or community background, having their right to clean water and sanitation, we must take decisive and inclusive action now,” said Chief Executive Tim Wainwright. (VOA)