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OPPO Showcases 5G Prototype of its Find X Smartphone in China

OPPO said it was also in talks with telecom service providers in Europe, Australia and other overseas markets, with plans to launch commercial 5G products next year

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OPPO launches first India R&D centre in Hyderabad. (Wikimedia Commons)

Chinese smartphone maker OPPO said it showcased in China a 5G prototype of its flagship Find X smartphone.

The OPPO Find X 5G prototype, powered by Snapdragon 855 and X50 5G modem, was unveiled at the 2018 China Mobile Global Partners Conference, which was held here from December 6-8.

“We are confident OPPO will be one of the first companies to launch commercial 5G smartphones in 2019,” said Brian Shen, OPPO Global Vice President and President of China Business.

OPPO said it would work together with industry partners worldwide to develop a new 5G ecosystem.

At the event, OPPO, chip-making giant Qualcomm and Keysight Technologies Inc., a leading electronic measurement company, demonstrated 5G data connectivity and applications including browsing, online video replay and video call using the Find X 5G prototype, the handset maker said.

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OPPO said it would work together with industry partners worldwide to develop a new 5G ecosystem. (IANS)

The OPPO Find X flagship smartphone was launched earlier this year.

In building a 5G ecosystem, OPPO said it would continue deepening its collaboration with Qualcomm, network infrastructure manufacturers, telecom service providers and other supply chain partners.

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In China, OPPO is in a strategic partnership with China Mobile to accelerate the commercialisation of 5G devices and build a new ecosystem for the 5G industry through China Mobile’s “5G Device Forerunner Initiative”.

OPPO said it was also in talks with telecom service providers in Europe, Australia and other overseas markets, with plans to launch commercial 5G products next year. (IANS)

Next Story

Google Claims It Has “No Plans” To Relaunch A Search Engine in China

Technology companies have recently been a favorite target of many members of the U.S. Congress, who have criticized them over a wide range of issues such as privacy, work in China and allowing foreign meddling in U.S. elections.

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The Chinese flag is seen near the Google sign at the Google china headquarters in Beijing, China. VOA

The United States’ top general said on Thursday that the Chinese military was benefiting from the work Alphabet Inc’s Google was doing in China, where the technology giant has long sought to have a bigger presence.

“The work that Google is doing in China is indirectly benefiting the Chinese military,” Marine General Joseph Dunford, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said during a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing.

“We watch with great concern when industry partners work in China knowing that there is that indirect benefit,” he said.

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Lawmakers and Google employees have raised concerns the company would comply with China’s internet censorship and surveillance policies if it re-enters the Asian nation’s search engine market. Pixabay

“Frankly, ‘indirect’ may be not a full characterization of the way it really is, it is more of a direct benefit to the Chinese military.”

Last year Google said it was no longer vying for a $10 billion cloud computing contract with the U.S. Defense Department, in part because the company’s new ethical guidelines do not align with the project.

In June, Google said it would not renew a contract to help the U.S. military analyze aerial drone imagery when it expires, as the company sought to defuse an internal uproar over the deal.

At the same time, Google said it has “no plans” to relaunch a search engine in China, though it is continuing to study the idea.

During the hearing, Republican Senator Josh Hawley sharply criticized the tech company, referring to it as “a supposedly American company.”

FILE - Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., speaks during a hearing of a Senate Judiciary Committee in Washington, March 6, 2019.
Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., speaks during a hearing of a Senate Judiciary Committee in Washington, March 6, 2019. VOA

Technology companies have recently been a favorite target of many members of the U.S. Congress, who have criticized them over a wide range of issues such as privacy, work in China and allowing foreign meddling in U.S. elections.

Lawmakers and Google employees have raised concerns the company would comply with China’s internet censorship and surveillance policies if it re-enters the Asian nation’s search engine market.

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Asked about Dunford’s comments, Google referred to previous statements.

Google Chief Executive Sundar Pichai has previously said the company has invested in China for years and plans to continue to do so, but that the company also was continuing to work with the U.S. government on projects in health care, cybersecurity and other fields. (VOA)