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OPPO ‘Find X’ with AI-Driven Stealth 3D Cameras in India

The "Find X Automobili Lamborghini Edition" supports SuperVOOC "Flash Charge" technology and enables full charge in 35 minutes, has Qualcomm Snapdragon 845 mobile platform and a massive 8GB RAM and 512GB memory combination

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OPPO
OPPO announces world’s 1st under-screen camera phone. (Wikimedia Commons)

Chinese smartphone maker OPPO on Thursday launched its flagship smartphone “Find X” in India for Rs 59,990. It has the world’s first stealth 3D cameras with Artificial Intelligence (AI) infused into it and a sliding structure that nearly mirrors the way a semi-DSLR camera works.

The new stealth design includes a flood illuminator, an infrared camera, a ranging sensor, a receiver, a front camera, a dot projector and a rear dual-camera.

With the sliding structure of the camera, the whole system automatically stretches out when unlocked or when a user is taking photos. It will retract if it is not in use.

The pre-order for the 8GB RAM and 256GB internal storage device will begin on Flipkart on July 30 and the smartphone will be available from August 3.

“The ‘Find’ series represents OPPO’s innovative spirit that believes that a smartphone isn’t just a communication tool but also a piece of art,” said Charles Wong, OPPO’s Assistant Vice President and OPPO India President.

“‘Find X’ aims to offer our Indian consumers a premium, innovative and technologically advanced offering for an advanced smartphone experience,” added Wong who is responsible for building the company’s momentum in the domestic market.

The new stealth design includes a flood illuminator, an infrared camera, a ranging sensor, a receiver, a front camera, a dot projector and a rear dual-camera.
The new stealth design includes a flood illuminator, an infrared camera, a ranging sensor, a receiver, a front camera, a dot projector and a rear dual-camera. (IANS)

The dual-SIM device, available in Bordeaux Red and Glacier Blue variants, houses Qualcomm Snapdragon 845 — the most powerful CPU ever for a higher performance.

With 3730mAH battery, the device claims to run full-day with optimum usage. It sports a 6.42-inch panoramic arc screen with a much wider “19.5:9 aspect ratio”. It also sports 3D structured light facial recognition technology to unlock the phone in an instant.

The smartphone houses a 25MP AI-enhanced front camera with “3D AI Beauty Technology” that enhances the accuracy of facial recognition with 296 facial feature points, along with the 16MP+20MP rear dual camera system.

Also Read: Google Rolls Out ‘Morse Code’ Support on Gboard for iOS

The “Find X” is outfitted with the latest Google Assistant, activated with the voice command, “OK, Google,” for voice assistance to find information, schedule, make phone calls, play music, listen to weather forecasts and find locations.

The company also announced a special edition “FIND X Automobili Lamborghini Edition” that was launched globally as a part of its global, strategic partnership with Automobili Lamborghini S.p.A. (“Lamborghini”).

The “Find X Automobili Lamborghini Edition” supports SuperVOOC “Flash Charge” technology and enables full charge in 35 minutes, has Qualcomm Snapdragon 845 mobile platform and a massive 8GB RAM and 512GB memory combination. (IANS)

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Researchers Develop AI-driven System to Curb ‘Deepfake’ Videos

Roy-Chowdhury, however, thinks we still have a long way to go before automated tools can detect “deepfake” videos in the wild

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Artificial Intelligence Bot
Artificial Intelligence Bot. Pixabay

At a time when “deepfake” videos become a new threat to users’ privacy, a team of Indian-origin researchers has developed Artificial Intelligence (AI)-driven deep neural network that can identify manipulated images at the pixel level with high precision.

Realistic videos that map the facial expressions of one person onto those of another — known as “deepfakes”, present a formidable political weapon in the hands of nation-state bad actors.

Led by Amit Roy-Chowdhury, professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of California, Riverside, the team is currently working on still images but this can help them detect “deepfake” videos.

“We trained the system to distinguish between manipulated and nonmanipulated images and now if you give it a new image, it is able to provide a probability that that image is manipulated or not, and to localize the region of the image where the manipulation occurred,” said Roy-Chowdhury.

A deep neural network is what AI researchers call computer systems that have been trained to do specific tasks, in this case, recognize altered images.

These networks are organized in connected layers; “architecture” refers to the number of layers and structure of the connections between them.

While this might fool the naked eye, when examined pixel by pixel, the boundaries of the inserted object are different.

For example, they are often smoother than the natural objects.

artificial intelligence, nobel prize
“Artificial intelligence is now one of the fastest-growing areas in all of science and one of the most talked-about topics in society.” VOA

By detecting boundaries of inserted and removed objects, a computer should be able to identify altered images.

The researchers tested the neural network with a set of images it had never seen before, and it detected the altered ones most of the time. It even spotted the manipulated region.

“If you can understand the characteristics in a still image, in a video it’s basically just putting still images together one after another,” explained Roy-Chowdhury in a paper published in the journal IEEE Transactions on Image Processing.

“The more fundamental challenge is probably figuring out whether a frame in a video is manipulated or not”.

Also Read: TikTok Testing New Features Inspired by Instagram

Even a single manipulated frame would raise a red flag.

Roy-Chowdhury, however, thinks we still have a long way to go before automated tools can detect “deepfake” videos in the wild.

“This is kind of a cat and mouse game. This whole area of cybersecurity is in some ways trying to find better defense mechanisms, but then the attacker also finds better mechanisms.” (IANS)